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Extreme endurance flights by landbirds crossing the Pacific Ocean: ecological corridor rather than barrier?

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, October 2008
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
4 news outlets
blogs
4 blogs
policy
1 policy source
twitter
80 tweeters
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
googleplus
140 Google+ users

Citations

dimensions_citation
257 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
414 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Extreme endurance flights by landbirds crossing the Pacific Ocean: ecological corridor rather than barrier?
Published in
Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, October 2008
DOI 10.1098/rspb.2008.1142
Pubmed ID
Authors

Robert E Gill, T. Lee Tibbitts, David C Douglas, Colleen M Handel, Daniel M Mulcahy, Jon C Gottschalck, Nils Warnock, Brian J McCaffery, Philip F Battley, Theunis Piersma

Abstract

Mountain ranges, deserts, ice fields and oceans generally act as barriers to the movement of land-dependent animals, often profoundly shaping migration routes. We used satellite telemetry to track the southward flights of bar-tailed godwits (Limosa lapponica baueri), shorebirds whose breeding and non-breeding areas are separated by the vast central Pacific Ocean. Seven females with surgically implanted transmitters flew non-stop 8,117-11,680 km (10153+/-1043 s.d.) directly across the Pacific Ocean; two males with external transmitters flew non-stop along the same corridor for 7,008-7,390 km. Flight duration ranged from 6.0 to 9.4 days (7.8+/-1.3 s.d.) for birds with implants and 5.0 to 6.6 days for birds with externally attached transmitters. These extraordinary non-stop flights establish new extremes for avian flight performance, have profound implications for understanding the physiological capabilities of vertebrates and how birds navigate, and challenge current physiological paradigms on topics such as sleep, dehydration and phenotypic flexibility. Predicted changes in climatic systems may affect survival rates if weather conditions at their departure hub or along the migration corridor should change. We propose that this transoceanic route may function as an ecological corridor rather than a barrier, providing a wind-assisted passage relatively free of pathogens and predators.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 80 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 414 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 10 2%
United Kingdom 6 1%
Mexico 3 <1%
Netherlands 2 <1%
Sweden 2 <1%
Brazil 2 <1%
Portugal 1 <1%
Czechia 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Other 9 2%
Unknown 377 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 94 23%
Researcher 88 21%
Student > Master 74 18%
Student > Bachelor 36 9%
Other 25 6%
Other 55 13%
Unknown 42 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 260 63%
Environmental Science 60 14%
Engineering 10 2%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 2%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 6 1%
Other 25 6%
Unknown 45 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 255. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 October 2020.
All research outputs
#67,860
of 16,040,223 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#162
of 8,292 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#290
of 115,273 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#2
of 87 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,040,223 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,292 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 33.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 115,273 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 87 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.