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Massage-like stroking boosts the immune system in mice

Overview of attention for article published in Scientific Reports, June 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
55 tweeters
facebook
12 Facebook pages
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

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21 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
66 Mendeley
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Title
Massage-like stroking boosts the immune system in mice
Published in
Scientific Reports, June 2015
DOI 10.1038/srep10913
Pubmed ID
Authors

Benjamin Major, Lorenza Rattazzi, Samuel Brod, Ivan Pilipović, Gordana Leposavić, Fulvio D’Acquisto

Abstract

Recent clinical evidence suggests that the therapeutic effect of massage involves the immune system and that this can be exploited as an adjunct therapy together with standard drug-based approaches. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms behind these effects exploring the immunomodulatory function of stroking as a surrogate of massage-like therapy in mice. C57/BL6 mice were stroked daily for 8 days either with a soft brush or directly with a gloved hand and then analysed for differences in their immune repertoire compared to control non-stroked mice. Our results show that hand- but not brush-stroked mice demonstrated a significant increase in thymic and splenic T cell number (p < 0.05; p < 0.01). These effects were not associated with significant changes in CD4/CD8 lineage commitment or activation profile. The boosting effects on T cell repertoire of massage-like therapy were associated with a decreased noradrenergic innervation of lymphoid organs and counteracted the immunosuppressive effect of hydrocortisone in vivo. Together our results in mice support the hypothesis that massage-like therapies might be of therapeutic value in the treatment of immunodeficiencies and related disorders and suggest a reduction of the inhibitory noradrenergic tone in lymphoid organs as one of the possible explanations for their immunomodulatory function.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 55 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 66 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Sweden 1 2%
Switzerland 1 2%
Unknown 64 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 11 17%
Other 9 14%
Researcher 9 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 14%
Student > Bachelor 6 9%
Other 13 20%
Unknown 9 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 15 23%
Medicine and Dentistry 13 20%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 11%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 5%
Psychology 3 5%
Other 13 20%
Unknown 12 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 53. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 August 2021.
All research outputs
#627,041
of 21,735,696 outputs
Outputs from Scientific Reports
#7,024
of 116,168 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#8,439
of 251,026 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scientific Reports
#179
of 3,653 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,735,696 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 116,168 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 17.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 251,026 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3,653 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.