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A Pseudomonas putida efflux pump acts on short-chain alcohols

Overview of attention for article published in Biotechnology for Biofuels, May 2018
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (67th percentile)

Mentioned by

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7 tweeters

Citations

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3 Dimensions

Readers on

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46 Mendeley
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Title
A Pseudomonas putida efflux pump acts on short-chain alcohols
Published in
Biotechnology for Biofuels, May 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13068-018-1133-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Georg Basler, Mitchell Thompson, Danielle Tullman-Ercek, Jay Keasling

Abstract

The microbial production of biofuels is complicated by a tradeoff between yield and toxicity of many fuels. Efflux pumps enable bacteria to tolerate toxic substances by their removal from the cells while bypassing the periplasm. Their use for the microbial production of biofuels can help to improve cell survival, product recovery, and productivity. However, no native efflux pump is known to act on the class of short-chain alcohols, important next-generation biofuels, and it was considered unlikely that such an efflux pump exists. We report that controlled expression of the RND-type efflux pump TtgABC from Pseudomonas putida DOT-T1E strongly improved cell survival in highly toxic levels of the next-generation biofuels n-butanol, isobutanol, isoprenol, and isopentanol. GC-FID measurements indicated active efflux of n-butanol when the pump is expressed. Conversely, pump expression did not lead to faster growth in media supplemented with low concentrations of n-butanol and isopentanol. TtgABC is the first native efflux pump shown to act on multiple short-chain alcohols. Its controlled expression can be used to improve cell survival and increase production of biofuels as an orthogonal approach to metabolic engineering. Together with the increased interest in P. putida for metabolic engineering due to its flexible metabolism, high native tolerance to toxic substances, and various applications of engineering its metabolism, our findings endorse the strain as an excellent biocatalyst for the high-yield production of next-generation biofuels.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 46 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 46 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 26%
Student > Master 6 13%
Student > Bachelor 5 11%
Researcher 5 11%
Lecturer 2 4%
Other 5 11%
Unknown 11 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 20 43%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 17%
Environmental Science 2 4%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 2%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 2%
Other 2 4%
Unknown 12 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 June 2018.
All research outputs
#3,611,941
of 14,155,231 outputs
Outputs from Biotechnology for Biofuels
#289
of 1,096 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#87,766
of 275,067 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Biotechnology for Biofuels
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,155,231 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 74th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,096 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 275,067 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them