↓ Skip to main content

An EAACI task force report: recognising the potential of the primary care physician in the diagnosis and management of drug hypersensitivity

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical and Translational Allergy, May 2018
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#20 of 449)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
41 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
8 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
24 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
An EAACI task force report: recognising the potential of the primary care physician in the diagnosis and management of drug hypersensitivity
Published in
Clinical and Translational Allergy, May 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13601-018-0202-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

I. Doña, J. C. Caubet, K. Brockow, M. Doyle, E. Moreno, I. Terreehorst, M. J. Torres

Abstract

Adverse drug reactions include drug hypersensitivity reactions (DHRs), which can be immunologically mediated (allergy) or non-immunologically mediated. The high number of DHRs that are unconfirmed and often self-reported is a frequent problem in daily clinical practice, with considerable impact on future prescription choices and patient health. It is important to distinguish between hypersensitivity and non-hypersensitivity reactions by adopting a structured diagnostic approach to confirm or discard the suspected drug, not only to avoid life-threatening reactions, but also to reduce the frequent over-diagnosis of DHRs. Primary care physicians are often the first point of contact for the sufferer of a reaction, as such they have a key role in deciding whether to discard the diagnosis or send the patient for further investigation. In this review, we highlight the importance of diagnosing DHRs, analysing in detail the role of primary care physicians. We describe the common patterns of DHRs and signs of its progression, as well as the indications and contraindications for referring the patient to an allergist. The diagnostic process is described and the possible tests are discussed, which often depend on the drug involved and the type of DHR suspected. We also describe recommendations regarding the avoidance of medication suspected to have caused the reaction and the use of alternatives.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 41 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 24 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 24 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 6 25%
Other 2 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 8%
Student > Master 2 8%
Professor 1 4%
Other 3 13%
Unknown 8 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 12 50%
Psychology 1 4%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 4%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 4%
Unknown 9 38%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 26. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 December 2018.
All research outputs
#740,239
of 14,677,319 outputs
Outputs from Clinical and Translational Allergy
#20
of 449 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#25,352
of 275,058 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical and Translational Allergy
#1
of 3 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,677,319 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 449 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 275,058 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them