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Growth Anomalies on the Coral Genera Acropora and Porites Are Strongly Associated with Host Density and Human Population Size across the Indo-Pacific

Overview of attention for article published in PLOS ONE, February 2011
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (75th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (69th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog

Citations

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71 Dimensions

Readers on

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199 Mendeley
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Title
Growth Anomalies on the Coral Genera Acropora and Porites Are Strongly Associated with Host Density and Human Population Size across the Indo-Pacific
Published in
PLOS ONE, February 2011
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0016887
Pubmed ID
Authors

Greta S. Aeby, Gareth J. Williams, Erik C. Franklin, Jessica Haapkyla, C. Drew Harvell, Stephen Neale, Cathie A. Page, Laurie Raymundo, Bernardo Vargas-Ángel, Bette L. Willis, Thierry M. Work, Simon K. Davy

Abstract

Growth anomalies (GAs) are common, tumor-like diseases that can cause significant morbidity and decreased fecundity in the major Indo-Pacific reef-building coral genera, Acropora and Porites. GAs are unusually tractable for testing hypotheses about drivers of coral disease because of their pan-Pacific distributions, relatively high occurrence, and unambiguous ease of identification. We modeled multiple disease-environment associations that may underlie the prevalence of Acropora growth anomalies (AGA) (n = 304 surveys) and Porites growth anomalies (PGA) (n = 602 surveys) from across the Indo-Pacific. Nine predictor variables were modeled, including coral host abundance, human population size, and sea surface temperature and ultra-violet radiation anomalies. Prevalence of both AGAs and PGAs were strongly host density-dependent. PGAs additionally showed strong positive associations with human population size. Although this association has been widely posited, this is one of the first broad-scale studies unambiguously linking a coral disease with human population size. These results emphasize that individual coral diseases can show relatively distinct patterns of association with environmental predictors, even in similar diseases (growth anomalies) found on different host genera (Acropora vs. Porites). As human densities and environmental degradation increase globally, the prevalence of coral diseases like PGAs could increase accordingly, halted only perhaps by declines in host density below thresholds required for disease establishment.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 199 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 1%
Germany 1 <1%
Hong Kong 1 <1%
New Caledonia 1 <1%
Kenya 1 <1%
Malaysia 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Sweden 1 <1%
Belgium 1 <1%
Other 1 <1%
Unknown 188 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 41 21%
Student > Master 37 19%
Researcher 36 18%
Student > Bachelor 22 11%
Other 9 5%
Other 25 13%
Unknown 29 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 90 45%
Environmental Science 55 28%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 10 5%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 2%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 4 2%
Other 7 4%
Unknown 29 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 February 2011.
All research outputs
#5,028,228
of 20,587,020 outputs
Outputs from PLOS ONE
#55,136
of 177,689 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#32,283
of 131,245 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLOS ONE
#645
of 2,091 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,587,020 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 75th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 177,689 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 131,245 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2,091 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.