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The Late Miocene Radiation of Modern Felidae: A Genetic Assessment

Overview of attention for article published in Science, January 2006
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
5 news outlets
blogs
7 blogs
twitter
50 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages
wikipedia
57 Wikipedia pages
googleplus
2 Google+ users

Citations

dimensions_citation
455 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
1009 Mendeley
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Title
The Late Miocene Radiation of Modern Felidae: A Genetic Assessment
Published in
Science, January 2006
DOI 10.1126/science.1122277
Pubmed ID
Authors

W. E. Johnson

Abstract

Modern felid species descend from relatively recent (<11 million years ago) divergence and speciation events that produced successful predatory carnivores worldwide but that have confounded taxonomic classifications. A highly resolved molecular phylogeny with divergence dates for all living cat species, derived from autosomal, X-linked, Y-linked, and mitochondrial gene segments (22,789 base pairs) and 16 fossil calibrations define eight principal lineages produced through at least 10 intercontinental migrations facilitated by sea-level fluctuations. A ghost lineage analysis indicates that available felid fossils underestimate (i.e., unrepresented basal branch length) first occurrence by an average of 76%, revealing a low representation of felid lineages in paleontological remains. The phylogenetic performance of distinct gene classes showed that Y-chromosome segments are appreciably more informative than mitochondrial DNA, X-linked, or autosomal genes in resolving the rapid Felidae species radiation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 50 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 1,009 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 29 3%
United States 18 2%
Spain 7 <1%
India 7 <1%
United Kingdom 6 <1%
France 5 <1%
Colombia 4 <1%
Germany 4 <1%
Chile 3 <1%
Other 29 3%
Unknown 897 89%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 229 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 168 17%
Student > Bachelor 139 14%
Student > Master 138 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 66 7%
Other 202 20%
Unknown 67 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 638 63%
Environmental Science 109 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 63 6%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 46 5%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 13 1%
Other 48 5%
Unknown 92 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 119. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 April 2021.
All research outputs
#201,667
of 17,444,955 outputs
Outputs from Science
#6,753
of 70,838 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#892
of 120,480 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Science
#39
of 773 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,444,955 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 70,838 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 55.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 120,480 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 773 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.