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Molecular Mechanisms Involved in Vascular Interactions of the Lyme Disease Pathogen in a Living Host

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS Pathogens, October 2008
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (52nd percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

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76 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
44 Mendeley
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1 CiteULike
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Title
Molecular Mechanisms Involved in Vascular Interactions of the Lyme Disease Pathogen in a Living Host
Published in
PLoS Pathogens, October 2008
DOI 10.1371/journal.ppat.1000169
Pubmed ID
Authors

M. Ursula Norman, Tara J. Moriarty, Ashley R. Dresser, Brandie Millen, Paul Kubes, George Chaconas

Abstract

Hematogenous dissemination is important for infection by many bacterial pathogens, but is poorly understood because of the inability to directly observe this process in living hosts at the single cell level. All disseminating pathogens must tether to the host endothelium despite significant shear forces caused by blood flow. However, the molecules that mediate tethering interactions have not been identified for any bacterial pathogen except E. coli, which tethers to host cells via a specialized pillus structure that is not found in many pathogens. Furthermore, the mechanisms underlying tethering have never been examined in living hosts. We recently engineered a fluorescent strain of Borrelia burgdorferi, the Lyme disease pathogen, and visualized its dissemination from the microvasculature of living mice using intravital microscopy. We found that dissemination was a multistage process that included tethering, dragging, stationary adhesion and extravasation. In the study described here, we used quantitative real-time intravital microscopy to investigate the mechanistic features of the vascular interaction stage of B. burgdorferi dissemination. We found that tethering and dragging interactions were mechanistically distinct from stationary adhesion, and constituted the rate-limiting initiation step of microvascular interactions. Surprisingly, initiation was mediated by host Fn and GAGs, and the Fn- and GAG-interacting B. burgdorferi protein BBK32. Initiation was also strongly inhibited by the low molecular weight clinical heparin dalteparin. These findings indicate that the initiation of spirochete microvascular interactions is dependent on host ligands known to interact in vitro with numerous other bacterial pathogens. This conclusion raises the intriguing possibility that fibronectin and GAG interactions might be a general feature of hematogenous dissemination by other pathogens.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 44 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 1 2%
Mexico 1 2%
Iran, Islamic Republic of 1 2%
Sweden 1 2%
Netherlands 1 2%
Unknown 39 89%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 23%
Researcher 10 23%
Student > Bachelor 7 16%
Professor > Associate Professor 5 11%
Professor 3 7%
Other 9 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 21 48%
Medicine and Dentistry 9 20%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 14%
Immunology and Microbiology 4 9%
Unspecified 1 2%
Other 3 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 January 2019.
All research outputs
#6,661,935
of 13,226,211 outputs
Outputs from PLoS Pathogens
#4,024
of 6,167 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#50,607
of 107,146 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS Pathogens
#75
of 128 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,226,211 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,167 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.9. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 107,146 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 128 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.