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Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus as an Agent of Emerging and Reemerging Infection

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Microbiology Reviews, October 2007
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#1 of 984)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (85th percentile)

Citations

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378 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
1287 Mendeley
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1 CiteULike
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Title
Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus as an Agent of Emerging and Reemerging Infection
Published in
Clinical Microbiology Reviews, October 2007
DOI 10.1128/cmr.00023-07
Pubmed ID
Authors

Vincent C. C. Cheng, Susanna K. P. Lau, Patrick C. Y. Woo, Kwok Yung Yuen

Abstract

Before the emergence of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus (SARS-CoV) in 2003, only 12 other animal or human coronaviruses were known. The discovery of this virus was soon followed by the discovery of the civet and bat SARS-CoV and the human coronaviruses NL63 and HKU1. Surveillance of coronaviruses in many animal species has increased the number on the list of coronaviruses to at least 36. The explosive nature of the first SARS epidemic, the high mortality, its transient reemergence a year later, and economic disruptions led to a rush on research of the epidemiological, clinical, pathological, immunological, virological, and other basic scientific aspects of the virus and the disease. This research resulted in over 4,000 publications, only some of the most representative works of which could be reviewed in this article. The marked increase in the understanding of the virus and the disease within such a short time has allowed the development of diagnostic tests, animal models, antivirals, vaccines, and epidemiological and infection control measures, which could prove to be useful in randomized control trials if SARS should return. The findings that horseshoe bats are the natural reservoir for SARS-CoV-like virus and that civets are the amplification host highlight the importance of wildlife and biosecurity in farms and wet markets, which can serve as the source and amplification centers for emerging infections.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 13,292 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 1,287 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 4 <1%
United States 2 <1%
Australia 2 <1%
Puerto Rico 1 <1%
Vietnam 1 <1%
Unknown 1277 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 191 15%
Student > Master 178 14%
Student > Bachelor 172 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 158 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 77 6%
Other 297 23%
Unknown 214 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 189 15%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 159 12%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 158 12%
Immunology and Microbiology 59 5%
Engineering 51 4%
Other 376 29%
Unknown 295 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8965. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 October 2020.
All research outputs
#84
of 16,094,474 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Microbiology Reviews
#1
of 984 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2
of 281,028 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Microbiology Reviews
#1
of 7 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,094,474 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 984 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 22.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 281,028 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 7 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them