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The use of routine outcome monitoring in child semi-residential psychiatry: predicting parents’ completion rates

Overview of attention for article published in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health, June 2015
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Title
The use of routine outcome monitoring in child semi-residential psychiatry: predicting parents’ completion rates
Published in
Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health, June 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13034-015-0049-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Audri Lamers, Chijs van Nieuwenhuizen, Bart Siebelink, Thijs Blaauw, Robert Vermeiren

Abstract

Parents' perspectives on their children's treatment process and outcomes are valuable to treatment development and improvement. Participants' engagement in Routine Outcome Monitoring (ROM) has, however, been difficult and may particularly be so in specialized settings, such as semi-residential psychiatry. In this paper, the use of a web-based ROM system implemented in a child semi-residential psychiatric setting is described and predictors associated with low completion rates of questionnaires by parents are identified. Parents and the multidisciplinary team of 46 children admitted to semi-residential psychiatric treatment participated in this study and completed a battery of questionnaires in three month intervals. The overall completion rate of both parents during ROM assessment was 77 % compared to 83 % of all clinicians involved. Completion of questionnaires by parents was higher around first assessments and declined after a year treatment. For eight clients at least one of the parents stopped filling out questionnaires during ROM measuring. Logistic multilevel analyses revealed initial treatment factors associated with a low completion of questionnaires by parents during ROM: high comorbidity of the child on DSM Axis I, single parenthood, a higher parental educational level and having a weaker therapeutic alliance regarding goal setting. The findings in this paper demonstrate relatively high completion of questionnaires by clinicians and parents when using ROM in child semi-residential psychiatry. Strong administrative and electronic support undoubtedly contributed to this result. Clinicians are encouraged to motivate parents to mutually invest in ROM, and to take into account factors indicating a possible lower completion of questionnaires by parents.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 47 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 2%
Unknown 46 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 5 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 11%
Student > Bachelor 4 9%
Student > Master 4 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 9%
Other 11 23%
Unknown 14 30%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 14 30%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 11%
Social Sciences 3 6%
Sports and Recreations 1 2%
Other 4 9%
Unknown 14 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 July 2015.
All research outputs
#11,518,744
of 14,535,828 outputs
Outputs from Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health
#387
of 460 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#162,506
of 236,610 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,535,828 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 460 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.9. This one is in the 6th percentile – i.e., 6% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 236,610 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them