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Impact of calorie labelling in worksite cafeterias: a stepped wedge randomised controlled pilot trial

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, May 2018
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
59 tweeters

Citations

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9 Dimensions

Readers on

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40 Mendeley
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Title
Impact of calorie labelling in worksite cafeterias: a stepped wedge randomised controlled pilot trial
Published in
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, May 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12966-018-0671-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Milica Vasiljevic, Emma Cartwright, Mark Pilling, Mei-Man Lee, Giacomo Bignardi, Rachel Pechey, Gareth J. Hollands, Susan A. Jebb, Theresa M. Marteau

Abstract

For working adults, about one-third of energy is consumed in the workplace making this an important context in which to reduce energy intake to tackle obesity. The aims of the current study were first, to identify barriers to the feasibility and acceptability of implementing calorie labelling in preparation for a larger trial, and second, to estimate the potential impact of calorie labelling on energy purchased in worksite cafeterias. Six worksite cafeterias were randomised to the intervention starting at one of six fortnightly periods, using a stepped wedge design. The trial was conducted between August and December 2016, across 17 study weeks. The intervention comprised labelling all cafeteria products for which such information was available with their calorie content (e.g. "250 Calories") displayed in the same font style and size as for price. A post-intervention survey with cafeteria patrons and interviews with managers and caterers were used to assess the feasibility and acceptability of the intervention. Intervention impact was assessed using generalised linear mixed modelling. The primary outcome was the total energy (kcal) purchased from intervention items in each cafeteria each day. Recruitment and retention of worksite cafeterias proved feasible, with post-intervention feedback suggesting high levels of intervention acceptability. Several barriers to intervention implementation were identified, including chefs' discretion at implementing recipes and the manual recording of sales data. There was no overall effect of the intervention: -0.4% (95%CI -3.8 to 2.9, p = .803). One site showed a statistically significant effect of the intervention, with an estimated 6.6% reduction (95%CI -12.9 to - 0.3, p = .044) in energy purchased in the day following the introduction of calorie labelling, an effect that diminished over time. The remaining five sites did not show robust changes in energy purchased when calorie labelling was introduced. A calorie labelling intervention was acceptable to both cafeteria operators and customers. The predicted effect of labelling to reduce energy purchased was only evident at one out of six sites studied. Before progressing to a full trial, the calorie labelling intervention needs to be optimised, and a number of operational issues resolved. ISRCTN52923504 ; Registered: 22/09/2016; retrospectively registered.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 59 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 40 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 40 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 10 25%
Researcher 6 15%
Unspecified 6 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 10%
Student > Bachelor 4 10%
Other 10 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 9 23%
Psychology 8 20%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 18%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 15%
Social Sciences 3 8%
Other 7 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 42. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 March 2019.
All research outputs
#420,108
of 13,668,592 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#167
of 1,377 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#16,765
of 270,653 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#1
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,668,592 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,377 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 22.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 270,653 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them