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Comprehensive, Integrative Genomic Analysis of Diffuse Lower-Grade Gliomas

Overview of attention for article published in New England Journal of Medicine, June 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (86th percentile)

Citations

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1065 Dimensions

Readers on

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1023 Mendeley
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4 CiteULike
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Title
Comprehensive, Integrative Genomic Analysis of Diffuse Lower-Grade Gliomas
Published in
New England Journal of Medicine, June 2015
DOI 10.1056/nejmoa1402121
Pubmed ID
Abstract

Background Diffuse low-grade and intermediate-grade gliomas (which together make up the lower-grade gliomas, World Health Organization grades II and III) have highly variable clinical behavior that is not adequately predicted on the basis of histologic class. Some are indolent; others quickly progress to glioblastoma. The uncertainty is compounded by interobserver variability in histologic diagnosis. Mutations in IDH, TP53, and ATRX and codeletion of chromosome arms 1p and 19q (1p/19q codeletion) have been implicated as clinically relevant markers of lower-grade gliomas. Methods We performed genomewide analyses of 293 lower-grade gliomas from adults, incorporating exome sequence, DNA copy number, DNA methylation, messenger RNA expression, microRNA expression, and targeted protein expression. These data were integrated and tested for correlation with clinical outcomes. Results Unsupervised clustering of mutations and data from RNA, DNA-copy-number, and DNA-methylation platforms uncovered concordant classification of three robust, nonoverlapping, prognostically significant subtypes of lower-grade glioma that were captured more accurately by IDH, 1p/19q, and TP53 status than by histologic class. Patients who had lower-grade gliomas with an IDH mutation and 1p/19q codeletion had the most favorable clinical outcomes. Their gliomas harbored mutations in CIC, FUBP1, NOTCH1, and the TERT promoter. Nearly all lower-grade gliomas with IDH mutations and no 1p/19q codeletion had mutations in TP53 (94%) and ATRX inactivation (86%). The large majority of lower-grade gliomas without an IDH mutation had genomic aberrations and clinical behavior strikingly similar to those found in primary glioblastoma. Conclusions The integration of genomewide data from multiple platforms delineated three molecular classes of lower-grade gliomas that were more concordant with IDH, 1p/19q, and TP53 status than with histologic class. Lower-grade gliomas with an IDH mutation either had 1p/19q codeletion or carried a TP53 mutation. Most lower-grade gliomas without an IDH mutation were molecularly and clinically similar to glioblastoma. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health.).

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 130 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 1,023 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 17 2%
United Kingdom 7 <1%
Japan 3 <1%
Sweden 2 <1%
Netherlands 2 <1%
Italy 2 <1%
Czechia 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Other 10 <1%
Unknown 977 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 211 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 165 16%
Other 107 10%
Student > Bachelor 96 9%
Student > Master 93 9%
Other 262 26%
Unknown 89 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 403 39%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 189 18%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 157 15%
Neuroscience 50 5%
Computer Science 28 3%
Other 72 7%
Unknown 124 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 133. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 November 2019.
All research outputs
#118,816
of 13,974,181 outputs
Outputs from New England Journal of Medicine
#2,932
of 25,855 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,312
of 235,625 outputs
Outputs of similar age from New England Journal of Medicine
#46
of 340 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,974,181 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 25,855 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 65.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 235,625 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 340 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.