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More than 400 million years of evolution and some plants still can't make it on their own: plant stress tolerance via fungal symbiosis

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Experimental Botany, February 2008
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
1 tweeter
patent
3 patents
facebook
1 Facebook page
wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
271 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
397 Mendeley
citeulike
5 CiteULike
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Title
More than 400 million years of evolution and some plants still can't make it on their own: plant stress tolerance via fungal symbiosis
Published in
Journal of Experimental Botany, February 2008
DOI 10.1093/jxb/erm342
Pubmed ID
Authors

R. Rodriguez, R. Redman

Abstract

All plants in natural ecosystems are thought to be symbiotic with mycorrhizal and/or endophytic fungi. Collectively, these fungi express different symbiotic lifestyles ranging from parasitism to mutualism. Analysis of Colletotrichum species indicates that individual isolates can express either parasitic or mutualistic lifestyles depending on the host genotype colonized. The endophyte colonization pattern and lifestyle expression indicate that plants can be discerned as either disease, non-disease, or non-hosts. Fitness benefits conferred by fungi expressing mutualistic lifestyles include biotic and abiotic stress tolerance, growth enhancement, and increased reproductive success. Analysis of plant-endophyte associations in high stress habitats revealed that at least some fungal endophytes confer habitat-specific stress tolerance to host plants. Without the habitat-adapted fungal endophytes, the plants are unable to survive in their native habitats. Moreover, the endophytes have a broad host range encompassing both monocots and eudicots, and confer habitat-specific stress tolerance to both plant groups.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 397 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 14 4%
Canada 4 1%
Brazil 3 <1%
China 3 <1%
Mexico 2 <1%
India 2 <1%
Czechia 1 <1%
Norway 1 <1%
Poland 1 <1%
Other 8 2%
Unknown 358 90%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 114 29%
Researcher 87 22%
Student > Master 48 12%
Student > Bachelor 43 11%
Unspecified 24 6%
Other 81 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 286 72%
Unspecified 35 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 26 7%
Environmental Science 25 6%
Chemistry 9 2%
Other 16 4%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 22. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 May 2018.
All research outputs
#667,569
of 12,902,491 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Experimental Botany
#114
of 4,297 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#4,906
of 106,820 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Experimental Botany
#1
of 19 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,902,491 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,297 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 106,820 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 19 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.