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Sociodemographic variation in the use of chemotherapy and radiotherapy in patients with stage IV lung, oesophageal, stomach and pancreatic cancer: evidence from population-based data in England…

Overview of attention for article published in British Journal of Cancer, May 2018
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Title
Sociodemographic variation in the use of chemotherapy and radiotherapy in patients with stage IV lung, oesophageal, stomach and pancreatic cancer: evidence from population-based data in England during 2013–2014
Published in
British Journal of Cancer, May 2018
DOI 10.1038/s41416-018-0028-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Katherine E Henson, Anna Fry, Georgios Lyratzopoulos, Michael Peake, Keith J Roberts, Sean McPhail

Abstract

Sociodemographic inequalities in cancer treatment have been generally described, but there is little evidence regarding patients with advanced cancer. Understanding variation in the management of these patients may provide insights into likely mechanisms leading to inequalities in survival. We identified 50,232 patients with stage IV lung, oesophageal, pancreatic and stomach cancer from the English national cancer registry. A generalised linear model with a Poisson error structure was used to explore variation in radiotherapy and chemotherapy within 6 months from diagnosis by age, sex, deprivation, ethnicity, cancer site, comorbidity and, additionally, performance status. There was substantial variation by cancer site, large gradients by age, and non-trivial associations with comorbidity and deprivation. After full adjustment, more deprived patients were consistently least likely to be treated with chemotherapy alone or chemotherapy and radiotherapy combined compared with less deprived patients with equally advanced disease stage (treatment rate ratio: 0.82 95% CI (0.78, 0.87) for CT, 0.78 95% CI (0.71, 0.85) for CTRT p < 0.0001). There was marked variation in the management of patients with stage IV cancer. Routinely collected data could be used for surveillance across all cancers to help reduce treatment variation and optimise outcomes among patients with advanced cancer.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 15 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 15 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 5 33%
Student > Master 3 20%
Researcher 3 20%
Other 2 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 13%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 5 33%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 20%
Social Sciences 2 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 7%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 7%
Other 3 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 May 2018.
All research outputs
#9,937,433
of 12,985,916 outputs
Outputs from British Journal of Cancer
#7,342
of 8,009 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#187,303
of 270,634 outputs
Outputs of similar age from British Journal of Cancer
#76
of 86 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 8,009 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.1. This one is in the 7th percentile – i.e., 7% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 86 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 9th percentile – i.e., 9% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.