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Randomised controlled trial of a theory-based behavioural intervention to reduce formula milk intake

Overview of attention for article published in Archives of Disease in Childhood, May 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (85th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (77th percentile)

Mentioned by

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25 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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6 Dimensions

Readers on

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24 Mendeley
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Title
Randomised controlled trial of a theory-based behavioural intervention to reduce formula milk intake
Published in
Archives of Disease in Childhood, May 2018
DOI 10.1136/archdischild-2018-314784
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rajalakshmi Lakshman, Stephen J Sharp, Fiona Whittle, Annie Schiff, Wendy Hardeman, Lisa Irvine, Ed Wilson, Simon J Griffin, Ken K Ong

Abstract

To assess the efficacy of a theory-based behavioural intervention to prevent rapid weight gain in formula milk-fed infants. In this single (assessor) blind, randomised controlled trial, 669 healthy full-term infants receiving formula milk within 14 weeks of birth were individually randomised to intervention (n=340) or attention-matched control (n=329) groups. The intervention aimed to reduce formula milk intakes, and promote responsive feeding and growth monitoring to prevent rapid weight gain (≥+0.67 SD scores (SDS)). It was delivered to mothers by trained facilitators up to infant age 6 months through three face-to-face contacts, two telephone contacts and written materials. Retention was 93% (622) at 6 months, 88% (586) at 12 months and 94% attended ≥4/5 sessions. The intervention strengthened maternal attitudes to following infant feeding recommendations, reduced reported milk intakes at ages 3 (-14%; intervention vs control infants), 4 (-12%), 5 (-9%) and 6 (-7%) months, slowed initial infant weight gain from baseline to 6 months (mean change 0.32 vs 0.42 SDS, baseline-adjusted difference (intervention vs control) -0.08 (95% CI -0.17 to -0.004) SDS), but had no effect on the primary outcome of weight gain to 12 months (baseline-adjusted difference -0.04 (-0.17, 0.10) SDS). By 12 months, 40.3% of infants in the intervention group and 45.9% in the control group showed rapid weight gain (OR 0.84, 95% CI 0.59 to 1.17). Despite reducing milk intakes and initial weight gain, the intervention did not alter the high prevalence of rapid weight gain to age 12 months suggesting the need for sustained intervention. ISRCTN20814693.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 25 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 24 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 24 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 6 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 21%
Student > Master 5 21%
Researcher 3 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 8%
Other 3 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 7 29%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 25%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 17%
Social Sciences 3 13%
Computer Science 1 4%
Other 3 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 14. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 November 2018.
All research outputs
#1,025,609
of 12,968,588 outputs
Outputs from Archives of Disease in Childhood
#560
of 5,365 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#38,527
of 270,779 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Archives of Disease in Childhood
#28
of 125 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,968,588 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,365 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 270,779 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 125 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its contemporaries.