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Laparoscopic surgery in abdominal trauma: a single center review of a 7-year experience

Overview of attention for article published in World Journal of Emergency Surgery, March 2015
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Mentioned by

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1 tweeter

Citations

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27 Dimensions

Readers on

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43 Mendeley
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Title
Laparoscopic surgery in abdominal trauma: a single center review of a 7-year experience
Published in
World Journal of Emergency Surgery, March 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13017-015-0007-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kyoung Hoon Lim, Bong Soo Chung, Jong Yeol Kim, Sung Soo Kim

Abstract

Laparoscopic surgery has greatly improved surgical outcome in many areas of abdominal surgery. But many concerns of safety have limited its application in abdominal trauma. We hypothesized that laparoscopy could be safe and efficacious in treatment of patients with abdominal trauma, and reduce the laparotomy related complications (i.e. wound infection, pain, or long hospital stay) as avoiding unnecessary laparotomy. From January 2006 to August 2012, a total of 111 patients underwent emergent surgical exploration (laparoscopic, 41; open laparotomy, 70) in Andong General Hospital. Of the 41 patients subjected to laparoscopy, 30 patients had suffered blunt trauma, the remaining 11 patients had sustained penetrating trauma. 31 patients were treated exclusively by laparoscopy and 10 patients underwent laparoscopy-assisted surgery. The conversion rate was 18%. Major complication was none without postoperative mortality. Comparing laparoscopic surgery with open laparotomy, lesser wound infection, early gas passage, and shorter hospital stay. Otherwise operative times were similar, and neither approach was complicated by missed injury or postoperative intra-abdominal abscess. Laparoscopic surgery can be performed safely whether injuries are blunt or penetrating, given hemodynamic stability and proper technique. Patients may thus benefit from the shorter hospital stays, greater postoperative comfort (less pain), quicker recoveries, and low morbidity/mortality rates that laparoscopy affords.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 43 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 43 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Postgraduate 7 16%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 12%
Researcher 4 9%
Student > Master 4 9%
Other 14 33%
Unknown 3 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 29 67%
Engineering 3 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 5%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 2%
Unknown 8 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 June 2015.
All research outputs
#7,804,914
of 12,440,542 outputs
Outputs from World Journal of Emergency Surgery
#153
of 316 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#124,686
of 232,980 outputs
Outputs of similar age from World Journal of Emergency Surgery
#2
of 3 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,440,542 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 316 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.9. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 232,980 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.