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Testing the role of ecology and life history in structuring genetic variation across a landscape: a trait-based phylogeographic approach

Overview of attention for article published in Molecular Ecology, July 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (85th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (78th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
20 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
36 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
188 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Testing the role of ecology and life history in structuring genetic variation across a landscape: a trait-based phylogeographic approach
Published in
Molecular Ecology, July 2015
DOI 10.1111/mec.13275
Pubmed ID
Authors

Andrea Paz, Roberto Ibáñez, Karen R. Lips, Andrew J. Crawford

Abstract

Hypotheses to explain phylogeographic structure traditionally invoke geographic features, but often fail to provide a general explanation for spatial patterns of genetic variation. Organism's intrinsic characteristics might play more important roles than landscape features in determining phylogeographic structure. We developed a novel comparative approach to explore the role of ecological and life-history variables in determining spatial genetic variation and tested it on frog communities in Panama. We quantified spatial genetic variation within 31 anuran species based on mitochondrial DNA sequences, for which hierarchical approximate Bayesian computation analyses rejected simultaneous divergence over a common landscape. Regressing ecological variables on genetic divergence allowed us to test the importance of individual variables revealing that body size, current landscape resistance, geographic range, biogeographic origin, and reproductive mode were significant predictors of spatial genetic variation. Our results support the idea that phylogeographic structure represents the outcome of an interaction between organisms and environment, and suggest a conceptual integration we refer to as ecophylogeography. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 20 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 188 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 6 3%
Brazil 3 2%
France 1 <1%
Chile 1 <1%
Denmark 1 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
Portugal 1 <1%
Unknown 174 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 49 26%
Student > Master 30 16%
Researcher 25 13%
Student > Bachelor 21 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 17 9%
Other 33 18%
Unknown 13 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 136 72%
Environmental Science 19 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 13 7%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 2 1%
Computer Science 1 <1%
Other 2 1%
Unknown 15 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 October 2015.
All research outputs
#1,709,900
of 14,253,819 outputs
Outputs from Molecular Ecology
#1,136
of 4,638 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#33,736
of 234,163 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Molecular Ecology
#27
of 123 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,253,819 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 87th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,638 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 234,163 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 123 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.