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First-wave protease inhibitors for hepatitis C genotype 1 treatment: a real-life experience in Brazilian patients

Overview of attention for article published in Revista da Sociedade Brasileira de Medicina Tropical, April 2018
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Title
First-wave protease inhibitors for hepatitis C genotype 1 treatment: a real-life experience in Brazilian patients
Published in
Revista da Sociedade Brasileira de Medicina Tropical, April 2018
DOI 10.1590/0037-8682-0153-2017
Pubmed ID
Authors

Silvana Gama Florencio Chachá, João Paulo Vilela Rodrigues, Roberta Chaves Araújo, Leonardo Régis Leira Pereira, Márcia Guimarães Villanova, Fernanda Fernandes Souza, Rodrigo de Carvalho Santana, Ana de Lourdes Candolo Martinelli

Abstract

Licensed for chronic hepatitis C treatment in 2011, the protease inhibitors (PIs) telaprevir (TVR) and boceprevir (BOC), which have high sustained viral responses (SVR), ushered a new era characterized by the development of direct-action drugs against the hepatitis C virus (HCV). The aim of this study was to analyze the effectiveness and safety of BOC and TVR administered with pegylated interferon and ribavirin and to share the experience of a Brazilian reference center. A retrospective descriptive study was conducted in patients with HCV genotype 1 infection who started treatment between July 2013 and December 2015. Data were collected using a computerized system. A total of 115 subjects were included, of which 58 (50.4 %) had liver cirrhosis and 103 (89.6 %) used TVR. The overall SVR rate was 61.7 % (62.1 % for TVR and 58.3 % for BOC). The presence of cirrhosis was associated with a lower SVR rate, whereas patients who relapsed after prior therapy had a greater chance of showing SVR than did non-responders. The incidence of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) was high. Almost all patients (~100 %) presented with hematologic events. Furthermore, treatment had to be discontinued in 15 subjects (13 %) due to severe ADRs. In conclusion, the SVR rates in our study were lower than those reported in pre-marketing studies but were comparable to real-life data. ADRs, particularly hematological ADRs, were more common compared to those in previous studies and resulted in a high rate of treatment discontinuity.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 24 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 24 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 4 17%
Student > Master 4 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 13%
Student > Bachelor 3 13%
Professor > Associate Professor 1 4%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 9 38%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 29%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 3 13%
Psychology 1 4%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 4%
Neuroscience 1 4%
Other 1 4%
Unknown 10 42%