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From economic survival to recreation: contemporary uses of wild food and medicine in rural Sweden, Ukraine and NW Russia

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, June 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (74th percentile)

Mentioned by

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4 tweeters
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1 Facebook page
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1 Google+ user

Citations

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44 Dimensions

Readers on

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79 Mendeley
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Title
From economic survival to recreation: contemporary uses of wild food and medicine in rural Sweden, Ukraine and NW Russia
Published in
Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, June 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13002-015-0036-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nataliya Stryamets, Marine Elbakidze, Melissa Ceuterick, Per Angelstam, Robert Axelsson

Abstract

There are many ethnobotanical studies on the use of wild plants and mushrooms for food and medicinal treatment in Europe. However, there is a lack of comparative ethnobotanical research on the role of non-wood forest products (NWFPs) as wild food and medicine in local livelihoods in countries with different socio-economic conditions. The aim of this study was to compare the present use of wild food and medicine in three places representing different stages of socio-economic development in Europe. Specifically we explore which plant and fungi species people use for food and medicine in three selected rural regions of Sweden, Ukraine and the Russian Federation. We studied the current use of NWFPs for food and medicine in three rural areas that represent a gradient in economic development (as indicated by the World Bank), i.e., Småland high plain (south Sweden), Roztochya (western Ukraine), and Kortkeros (Komi Republic in North West Russia). All areas were characterised by (a) predominating rural residency, (b) high forest coverage, and (c) free access to NWFPs. A total of 205 in-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted with local residents in the three study areas. The collected NWFPs data included (1) the species that are used; (2) the amount harvested, (3) uses and practices (4) changes over time, (5) sources of knowledge regarding the use of NWFPs as wild food and medicine and (6) traditional recipes. In Sweden 11 species of wild plant and fungi species were used as food, and no plant species were used for medicinal purposes. In Ukraine the present use of NWFPs included 26 wild foods and 60 medicinal species, while in Russia 36 food and 44 medicinal species were reported. In the economically less developed rural areas of Ukraine and Russia, the use of NWFPs continues to be an important part of livelihoods, both as a source of income and for domestic use as food and medicine. In Sweden the collection of wild food has become mainly a recreational activity and the use of medicinal plants is no longer prevalent among our respondents. This leads us to suggest that the consumption of wild food and medicine is influenced by the socio-economic situation in a country.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 79 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Sweden 1 1%
Ecuador 1 1%
Unknown 77 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 14 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 15%
Student > Master 10 13%
Student > Bachelor 9 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 8%
Other 15 19%
Unknown 13 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 27 34%
Environmental Science 14 18%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 5%
Social Sciences 3 4%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 3 4%
Other 14 18%
Unknown 14 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 July 2015.
All research outputs
#3,527,720
of 13,600,986 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine
#173
of 589 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#59,492
of 233,096 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine
#2
of 4 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,600,986 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 73rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 589 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 233,096 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 2 of them.