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Cell free hemoglobin in the fetoplacental circulation: a novel cause of fetal growth restriction?

Overview of attention for article published in FASEB Journal, October 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (54th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (73rd percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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2 Dimensions

Readers on

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12 Mendeley
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Title
Cell free hemoglobin in the fetoplacental circulation: a novel cause of fetal growth restriction?
Published in
FASEB Journal, October 2018
DOI 10.1096/fj.201800264r
Pubmed ID
Authors

Adam Brook, Annie Hoaksey, Rekha Gurung, Edward E. C. Yoong, Rosanna Sneyd, Georgia C. Baynes, Helen Bischof, Sarah Jones, Lucy E. Higgins, Carolyn Jones, Susan L. Greenwood, Rebecca L. Jones, Magnus Gram, Ingrid Lang, Gernot Desoye, Jenny Myers, Henning Schneider, Stefan R. Hansson, Ian P. Crocker, Paul Brownbill

Abstract

Cell free hemoglobin impairs vascular function and blood flow in adult cardiovascular disease. In this study, we investigated the hypothesis that free fetal hemoglobin (fHbF) compromises vascular integrity and function in the fetoplacental circulation, contributing to the increased vascular resistance associated with fetal growth restriction (FGR). Women with normal and FGR pregnancies were recruited and their placentas collected freshly postpartum. FGR fetal capillaries showed evidence of erythrocyte vascular packing and extravasation. Fetal cord blood fHbF levels were higher in FGR than in normal pregnancies ( P < 0.05) and the elevation of fHbF in relation to heme oxygenase-1 suggests a failure of expected catabolic compensation, which occurs in adults. During ex vivo placental perfusion, pathophysiological fHbF concentrations significantly increased fetal-side microcirculatory resistance ( P < 0.05). fHbF sequestered NO in acute and chronic exposure models ( P < 0.001), and fHbF-primed placental endothelial cells developed a proinflammatory phenotype, demonstrated by activation of NF-κB pathway, generation of IL-1α and TNF-α (both P < 0.05), uncontrolled angiogenesis, and disruption of endothelial cell flow alignment. Elevated fHbF contributes to increased fetoplacental vascular resistance and impaired endothelial protection. This unrecognized mechanism for fetal compromise offers a novel insight into FGR as well as a potential explanation for associated poor fetal outcomes such as fetal demise and stillbirth.-Brook, A., Hoaksey, A., Gurung, R., Yoong, E. E. C., Sneyd, R., Baynes, G. C., Bischof, H., Jones, S., Higgins, L. E., Jones, C., Greenwood, S. L., Jones, R. L., Gram, M., Lang, I., Desoye, G., Myers, J., Schneider, H., Hansson, S. R., Crocker, I. P., Brownbill, P. Cell free hemoglobin in the fetoplacental circulation: a novel cause of fetal growth restriction?

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 12 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 12 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 42%
Unspecified 3 25%
Researcher 2 17%
Student > Master 1 8%
Student > Bachelor 1 8%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 6 50%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 33%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 June 2018.
All research outputs
#7,366,907
of 13,740,374 outputs
Outputs from FASEB Journal
#4,295
of 6,233 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#122,341
of 269,839 outputs
Outputs of similar age from FASEB Journal
#22
of 84 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,740,374 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,233 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.6. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 269,839 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 84 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.