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Circulating Selenium and Prostate Cancer Risk: A Mendelian Randomization Analysis

Overview of attention for article published in JNCI: Journal of the National Cancer Institute, May 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (78th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
16 tweeters

Readers on

mendeley
14 Mendeley
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Title
Circulating Selenium and Prostate Cancer Risk: A Mendelian Randomization Analysis
Published in
JNCI: Journal of the National Cancer Institute, May 2018
DOI 10.1093/jnci/djy081
Pubmed ID
Authors

James Yarmolinsky, Carolina Bonilla, Philip C Haycock, Ryan J Q Langdon, Luca A Lotta, Claudia Langenberg, Caroline L Relton, Sarah J Lewis, David M Evans, George Davey Smith, Richard M Martin

Abstract

In the Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT), selenium supplementation (causing a median 114 μg/L increase in circulating selenium) did not lower overall prostate cancer risk, but increased risk of high-grade prostate cancer and type 2 diabetes. Mendelian randomization analysis uses genetic variants to proxy modifiable risk factors and can strengthen causal inference in observational studies. We constructed a genetic instrument comprising 11 single nucleotide polymorphisms robustly (P < 5 × 10-8) associated with circulating selenium in genome-wide association studies. In a Mendelian randomization analysis of 72 729 men in the PRACTICAL Consortium (44 825 case subjects, 27 904 control subjects), 114 μg/L higher genetically elevated circulating selenium was not associated with prostate cancer (odds ratio [OR] = 1.01, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.89 to 1.13). In concordance with findings from SELECT, selenium was weakly associated with advanced (including high-grade) prostate cancer (OR = 1.21, 95% CI = 0.98 to 1.49) and type 2 diabetes (OR = 1.18, 95% CI = 0.97 to 1.43; in a type 2 diabetes genome-wide association study meta-analysis with up to 49 266 case subjects and 249 906 control subjects). Our Mendelian randomization analyses do not support a role for selenium supplementation in prostate cancer prevention and suggest that supplementation could have adverse effects on risks of advanced prostate cancer and type 2 diabetes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 16 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 14 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 14 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 43%
Researcher 4 29%
Unspecified 2 14%
Professor > Associate Professor 1 7%
Student > Master 1 7%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 5 36%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 21%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 21%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 7%
Psychology 1 7%
Other 1 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 37. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 October 2018.
All research outputs
#391,731
of 12,381,880 outputs
Outputs from JNCI: Journal of the National Cancer Institute
#386
of 6,246 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#18,283
of 269,796 outputs
Outputs of similar age from JNCI: Journal of the National Cancer Institute
#13
of 60 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,381,880 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,246 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 269,796 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 60 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.