↓ Skip to main content

Ultra-processed food consumption in children from a Basic Health Unit

Overview of attention for article published in Jornal de Pediatria, November 2015
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (67th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (66th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
56 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
273 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Ultra-processed food consumption in children from a Basic Health Unit
Published in
Jornal de Pediatria, November 2015
DOI 10.1016/j.jped.2015.01.007
Pubmed ID
Authors

Karen Sparrenberger, Roberta Roggia Friedrich, Mariana Dihl Schiffner, Ilaine Schuch, Mário Bernardes Wagner

Abstract

To evaluate the contribution of ultra-processed food (UPF) on the dietary consumption of children treated at a Basic Health Unit and the associated factors. Cross-sectional study carried out with a convenience sample of 204 children, aged 2-10 years old, in Southern Brazil. Children's food intake was assessed using a 24-h recall questionnaire. Food items were classified as minimally processed, processed for culinary use, and ultra-processed. A semi-structured questionnaire was applied to collect socio-demographic and anthropometric variables. Overweight in children was classified using a Z score >2 for children younger than 5 and Z score >+1 for those aged between 5 and 10 years, using the body mass index for age. Overweight frequency was 34% (95% CI: 28-41%). Mean energy consumption was 1672.3kcal/day, with 47% (95% CI: 45-49%) coming from ultra-processed food. In the multiple linear regression model, maternal education (r=0.23; p=0.001) and child age (r=0.40; p<0.001) were factors associated with a greater percentage of UPF in the diet (r=0.42; p<0.001). Additionally, a statistically significant trend for higher UPF consumption was observed when data were stratified by child age and maternal educational level (p<0.001). The contribution of UPF is significant in children's diets and age appears to be an important factor for the consumption of such products.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 273 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 273 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 56 21%
Student > Master 52 19%
Student > Postgraduate 21 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 18 7%
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 5%
Other 37 14%
Unknown 74 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 72 26%
Medicine and Dentistry 51 19%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 14 5%
Social Sciences 13 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 3%
Other 31 11%
Unknown 83 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 September 2021.
All research outputs
#6,124,562
of 19,519,615 outputs
Outputs from Jornal de Pediatria
#139
of 727 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#75,956
of 242,276 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Jornal de Pediatria
#3
of 6 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,519,615 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 67th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 727 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.8. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 242,276 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 6 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 3 of them.