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Pharmacological agents for the prevention of vestibular migraine

Overview of attention for article published in Cochrane database of systematic reviews, June 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (81st percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
8 tweeters
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

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32 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
127 Mendeley
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Title
Pharmacological agents for the prevention of vestibular migraine
Published in
Cochrane database of systematic reviews, June 2015
DOI 10.1002/14651858.cd010600.pub2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Miguel Maldonado Fernández, Jasminder S Birdi, Greg J Irving, Louisa Murdin, Ilkka Kivekäs, Michael Strupp

Abstract

Vestibular migraine is a common cause of episodic vertigo. Many preventive treatments have been proposed for this condition, including calcium antagonists, beta-blockers, antidepressants, anticonvulsants, selective 5-HT1 agonists, serotonin antagonists and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). To assess the effects of pharmacological agents for the prevention of vestibular migraine. The Cochrane Ear, Nose and Throat Disorders Group (CENTDG) Trials Search Co-ordinator searched the CENTDG Trials Register; Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL 2015, Issue 5); PubMed; EMBASE; CINAHL; Web of Science; Clinicaltrials.gov; ICTRP and additional sources for published and unpublished trials. The date of the search was 5 June 2015. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in adults (over 18 years) with a diagnosis of vestibular migraine orprobable vestibular migraine according to the Bárány Society/International Headache Society (IHS) criteria, treated in any setting, comparing pharmacological treatments used in the prevention of vestibular migraine, including beta-blockers, calcium antagonists, anticonvulsants, antidepressants, serotonin antagonists and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) against placebo or no treatment. We used the standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. Our literature search identified 558 reports, however only 11 were sufficiently relevant for further assessment. We excluded two studies because they did not use the IHS diagnostic criteria for vestibular migraine. We excluded a further eight studies for various reasons related to their design (e.g. lack of placebo or no treatment comparator), aim (e.g. treatment of vestibular migraine rather than prevention) or conduct (e.g. early termination). We identified one ongoing study comparing metoprolol to placebo. The results of this study are awaited; recruitment of the last patient is expected by the end of 2016. We found no evidence from RCTs to answer the question set out in the review objectives. This review has identified the need for well-designed randomised controlled trials to answer questions about the efficacy of current and new treatments.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 127 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 126 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 22 17%
Researcher 22 17%
Student > Bachelor 16 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 6%
Student > Postgraduate 7 6%
Other 23 18%
Unknown 29 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 52 41%
Nursing and Health Professions 15 12%
Neuroscience 8 6%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 7 6%
Social Sciences 5 4%
Other 5 4%
Unknown 35 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 December 2019.
All research outputs
#2,748,340
of 16,246,652 outputs
Outputs from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#5,438
of 11,453 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#43,252
of 234,606 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#148
of 257 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,246,652 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 83rd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 11,453 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 23.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 234,606 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 257 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.