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Initial test of an emotional avoidance model of restriction in anorexia nervosa using ecological momentary assessment.

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Psychiatric Research, August 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (62nd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (55th percentile)

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4 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

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19 Mendeley
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Title
Initial test of an emotional avoidance model of restriction in anorexia nervosa using ecological momentary assessment.
Published in
Journal of Psychiatric Research, August 2015
DOI 10.1016/j.jpsychires.2015.06.016
Pubmed ID
Authors

Haynos, Ann F, Crosby, Ross D, Engel, Scott G, Lavender, Jason M, Wonderlich, Stephen A, Mitchell, James E, Peterson, Carol B, Crow, Scott J, Le Grange, Daniel

Abstract

It has been hypothesized that restrictive eating allows individuals with anorexia nervosa (AN) to avoid contact with negative emotions; however, this presumption has not been directly tested. In this study, we conducted an initial investigation examining whether restrictive eating serves an emotional avoidance function among individuals with AN. Females with AN (n = 118) reported on negative and positive affect, anxiety/tension, and eating behaviors at multiple time points daily over a 2-week period using ecological momentary assessment methodology. Affective patterns were compared using generalized estimating equation models between days in which participants reported either: (1) relatively high restriction (without binge eating); (2) relatively low restriction (without binge eating); (3) binge eating; or (4) no restriction or binge eating. We hypothesized that, if restriction were functioning to avoid negative affect, average negative affect and anxiety/tension, as well as average negative and positive affect lability, would be lower and average positive affect would be higher on days characterized by high levels of restriction compared to other eating patterns. Contrary to hypotheses: (1) average negative affect, anxiety/tension, and positive affect were not significantly different between days characterized by high restriction and those characterized by low or no restriction; (2) Negative affect and anxiety/tension lability were higher on days characterized by high restriction compared to no restriction or binge eating days; (3) Anxiety/tension lability was higher on days characterized by high versus low levels of restriction. This patterns of findings does not support an avoidance model of restrictive eating for individuals with AN.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 19 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 11%
United Kingdom 1 5%
Japan 1 5%
Unknown 15 79%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 26%
Student > Bachelor 4 21%
Student > Master 3 16%
Researcher 3 16%
Professor 2 11%
Other 2 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 13 68%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 16%
Philosophy 1 5%
Unspecified 1 5%
Computer Science 1 5%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 October 2015.
All research outputs
#2,224,721
of 6,356,958 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Psychiatric Research
#462
of 1,206 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#66,494
of 182,559 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Psychiatric Research
#30
of 70 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,356,958 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 64th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,206 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 182,559 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 70 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.