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Rapidly rotating second-generation progenitors for the ‘blue hook’ stars of ω Centauri

Overview of attention for article published in Nature, June 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (52nd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
7 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
8 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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22 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
14 Mendeley
Title
Rapidly rotating second-generation progenitors for the ‘blue hook’ stars of ω Centauri
Published in
Nature, June 2015
DOI 10.1038/nature14516
Pubmed ID
Authors

Marco Tailo, Francesca D’Antona, Enrico Vesperini, Marcella Di Criscienzo, Paolo Ventura, Antonino P. Milone, Andrea Bellini, Aaron Dotter, Thibaut Decressin, Annibale D’Ercole, Vittoria Caloi, Roberto Capuzzo-Dolcetta

Abstract

Horizontal branch stars belong to an advanced stage in the evolution of the oldest stellar galactic population, occurring either as field halo stars or grouped in globular clusters. The discovery of multiple populations in clusters that were previously believed to have single populations gave rise to the currently accepted theory that the hottest horizontal branch members (the 'blue hook' stars, which had late helium-core flash ignition, followed by deep mixing) are the progeny of a helium-rich 'second generation' of stars. It is not known why such a supposedly rare event (a late flash followed by mixing) is so common that the blue hook of ω Centauri contains approximately 30 per cent of the horizontal branch stars in the cluster, or why the blue hook luminosity range in this massive cluster cannot be reproduced by models. Here we report that the presence of helium core masses up to about 0.04 solar masses larger than the core mass resulting from evolution is required to solve the luminosity range problem. We model this by taking into account the dispersion in rotation rates achieved by the progenitors, whose pre-main-sequence accretion disk suffered an early disruption in the dense environment of the cluster's central regions, where second-generation stars form. Rotation may also account for frequent late-flash-mixing events in massive globular clusters.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 14 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Thailand 1 7%
Unknown 13 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 3 21%
Student > Bachelor 2 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 14%
Student > Postgraduate 2 14%
Professor 1 7%
Other 4 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Physics and Astronomy 10 71%
Psychology 1 7%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 7%
Unspecified 1 7%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 7%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 70. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 July 2015.
All research outputs
#217,487
of 12,771,232 outputs
Outputs from Nature
#14,168
of 66,779 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#4,853
of 232,440 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature
#487
of 1,020 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,771,232 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 66,779 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 73.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 232,440 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1,020 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.