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Association of residual feed intake with abundance of ruminal bacteria and biopolymer hydrolyzing enzyme activities during the peripartal period and early lactation in Holstein dairy cows

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Animal Science and Biotechnology, May 2018
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Title
Association of residual feed intake with abundance of ruminal bacteria and biopolymer hydrolyzing enzyme activities during the peripartal period and early lactation in Holstein dairy cows
Published in
Journal of Animal Science and Biotechnology, May 2018
DOI 10.1186/s40104-018-0258-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ahmed A. Elolimy, José M. Arroyo, Fernanda Batistel, Michael A. Iakiviak, Juan J. Loor

Abstract

Residual feed intake (RFI) in dairy cattle typically calculated at peak lactation is a measure of feed efficiency independent of milk production level. The objective of this study was to evaluate differences in ruminal bacteria, biopolymer hydrolyzing enzyme activities, and overall performance between the most- and the least-efficient dairy cows during the peripartal period. Twenty multiparous Holstein dairy cows with daily ad libitum access to a total mixed ration from d - 10 to d 60 relative to the calving date were used. Cows were classified into most-efficient (i.e. with low RFI, n = 10) and least-efficient (i.e. with high RFI, n = 10) based on a linear regression model involving dry matter intake (DMI), fat-corrected milk (FCM), changes in body weight (BW), and metabolic BW. The most-efficient cows had ~ 2.6 kg/d lower DMI at wk 4, 6, 7, and 8 compared with the least-efficient cows. In addition, the most-efficient cows had greater relative abundance of total ruminal bacterial community during the peripartal period. Compared with the least-efficient cows, the most-efficient cows had 4-fold greater relative abundance of Succinivibrio dextrinosolvens at d - 10 and d 10 around parturition and tended to have greater abundance of Fibrobacter succinogenes and Megaspheara elsdenii. In contrast, the relative abundance of Butyrivibrio proteoclasticus and Streptococcus bovis was lower and Succinimonas amylolytica and Prevotella bryantii tended to be lower in the most-efficient cows around calving. During the peripartal period, the most-efficient cows had lower enzymatic activities of cellulase, amylase, and protease compared with the least-efficient cows. The results suggest that shifts in ruminal bacteria and digestive enzyme activities during the peripartal period could, at least in part, be part of the mechanism associated with better feed efficiency in dairy cows.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 17 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 17 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 18%
Student > Master 3 18%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 12%
Professor 2 12%
Librarian 1 6%
Other 1 6%
Unknown 5 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 47%
Computer Science 1 6%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 6%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 6%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 6%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 5 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 May 2018.
All research outputs
#8,130,872
of 12,963,687 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Animal Science and Biotechnology
#141
of 288 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#163,396
of 271,319 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Animal Science and Biotechnology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,963,687 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 288 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.4. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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