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Manganese (Mn) toxicity to tropical freshwater species in low hardness water

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry, June 2015
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Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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16 Dimensions

Readers on

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17 Mendeley
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Title
Manganese (Mn) toxicity to tropical freshwater species in low hardness water
Published in
Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry, June 2015
DOI 10.1002/etc.3135
Pubmed ID
Authors

Harford, Andrew J., Mooney, Thomas J., Trenfield, Melanie A., van Dam, Rick A.

Abstract

Elevated Manganese (Mn) is a common contaminant issue for mine water discharges and previous studies have reported that its toxicity is ameliorated by H + , Ca2+ and Mg2+ ions. The toxicity of manganese (Mn) was assessed in a high risk scenario, i.e. the slightly acidic, soft waters of Magela Creek, Kakadu National Park, Northern Territory, Australia. Toxicity estimates were derived for six tropical freshwater species (Chlorella sp., Lemna aequinoctialis, Amerianna cumingi, Moinodaphnia macleayi, Hydra viridissima, and Mogurnda mogurnda). Low effect chronic inhibition concentration (IC10) and acute lethal concentration (LC05) values ranged between 140-80000 µg L-1, with three of the species tested (M. macleayi, A. cumingi and H. viridissima) being more sensitive to Mn than all but one species in the international literature (Hyalella azteca). A loss of Mn was observed on the final day for two of the H. viridissima toxicity tests, which may be a result of the complex speciation of Mn and biological oxidation. International data from toxicity tests conducted in natural water with a similar physico-chemistry to Magela Creek water, were combined with this current data to increase the sample size to produce a more reliable Species Sensitivity Distribution (SSD). A 99% protection Guideline Value (GV) of 73 (33- 466) µg L-1 was derived, the low value of this GV reflects the higher toxicity of Mn in slightly acidic soft waters. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 17 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 17 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Professor 3 18%
Student > Master 3 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 18%
Unspecified 2 12%
Student > Bachelor 2 12%
Other 4 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 53%
Unspecified 2 12%
Chemistry 2 12%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 2 12%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 6%
Other 1 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 June 2015.
All research outputs
#4,495,550
of 6,398,634 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry
#628
of 1,149 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#121,428
of 188,198 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry
#49
of 115 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,398,634 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,149 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.8. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 188,198 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 115 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.