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Linking carbon and water relations to drought-induced mortality inPinus flexilisseedlings

Overview of attention for article published in Tree Physiology, June 2015
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2 tweeters

Citations

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27 Dimensions

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70 Mendeley
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Title
Linking carbon and water relations to drought-induced mortality inPinus flexilisseedlings
Published in
Tree Physiology, June 2015
DOI 10.1093/treephys/tpv045
Pubmed ID
Authors

Keith Reinhardt, Matthew J. Germino, Lara M. Kueppers, Jean-Christophe Domec, Jeffry Mitton

Abstract

Survival of tree seedlings at high elevations has been shown to be limited by thermal constraints on carbon balance, but it is unknown if carbon relations also limit seedling survival at lower elevations, where water relations may be more important. We measured and modeled carbon fluxes and water relations in first-year Pinus flexilis seedlings in garden plots just beyond the warm edge of their natural range, and compared these with dry-mass gain and survival across two summers. We hypothesized that mortality in these seedlings would be associated with declines in water relations, more so than with carbon-balance limitations. Rather than gradual declines in survivorship across growing seasons, we observed sharp, large-scale mortality episodes that occurred once volumetric soil-moisture content dropped below 10%. By this point, seedling water potentials had decreased below -5 MPa, seedling hydraulic conductivity had decreased by 90% and seedling hydraulic resistance had increased by >900%. Additionally, non-structural carbohydrates accumulated in aboveground tissues at the end of both summers, suggesting impairments in phloem-transport from needles to roots. This resulted in low carbohydrate concentrations in roots, which likely impaired root growth and water uptake at the time of critically low soil moisture. While photosynthesis and respiration on a leaf area basis remained high until critical hydraulic thresholds were exceeded, modeled seedling gross primary productivity declined steadily throughout the summers. At the time of mortality, modeled productivity was insufficient to support seedling biomass-gain rates, metabolism and secondary costs. Thus the large-scale mortality events that we observed near the end of each summer were most directly linked with acute, episodic declines in plant hydraulic function that were linked with important changes in whole-seedling carbon relations.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 70 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 4%
Chile 1 1%
Germany 1 1%
Unknown 65 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 18 26%
Researcher 14 20%
Student > Master 14 20%
Student > Bachelor 5 7%
Professor > Associate Professor 5 7%
Other 10 14%
Unknown 4 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 32 46%
Environmental Science 20 29%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 5 7%
Engineering 3 4%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 1%
Other 1 1%
Unknown 8 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 July 2015.
All research outputs
#7,224,400
of 12,031,573 outputs
Outputs from Tree Physiology
#338
of 817 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#118,632
of 237,166 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Tree Physiology
#9
of 23 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,031,573 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 817 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 237,166 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 23 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.