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Cohort study of Anticoagulation Self-Monitoring (CASM): a prospective study of its effectiveness in the community

Overview of attention for article published in British Journal of General Practice, June 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (87th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (72nd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
13 tweeters
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
10 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
44 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Cohort study of Anticoagulation Self-Monitoring (CASM): a prospective study of its effectiveness in the community
Published in
British Journal of General Practice, June 2015
DOI 10.3399/bjgp15x685633
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ward, Alison, Tompson, Alice, Fitzmaurice, David, Sutton, Stephen, Perera, Rafael, Heneghan, Carl, A. Ward, A. Tompson, D. Fitzmaurice, S. Sutton, R. Perera, C. Heneghan

Abstract

Trials show that oral anticoagulation therapy (OAT) substantially reduces thromboembolic events without an increase in major haemorrhagic events, but it is not known whether these results translate into routine practice. To estimate the current levels of control and adverse events in patients self-monitoring OAT, explore the factors that predict success, and determine whether the level of side effects reported from randomised controlled trials are translated to a non-selected population. Prospective cohort study in the UK. Participants were aged ≥18 years and registered with a GP. Main outcomes were the proportion of participants, over 12 months, who were still self-monitoring, had not experienced adverse events, and had achieved >80% of time in therapeutic range (TTR). In total, 296 participants were recruited; their median age was 61 years and 55.1% were male. Participants were predominately professional or held a university qualification (82.7%). At 12 months, 267 (90.2%) were still self-monitoring. Mean TTR was 75.3% (standard deviation 16.9).Six serious and two minor adverse events were reported by GPs. Only 45.9% of participants received any in-person training at the outset. Increased age (P = 0.027), general wellbeing (EQ-5D visual score, P = 0.020), and lower target international normalised range (INR, P = 0.032) were all associated with high (>80% TTR) levels of control. The findings show that, even with little training, people on OAT can successfully self-monitor, and even self-manage, their INR. TTR was shown to improve with age. However, widespread use of self-monitoring of INR may be limited by the initial costs, as well as a lack of training and support at the outset.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 13 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 44 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 2%
Mexico 1 2%
Unknown 42 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 10 23%
Student > Master 7 16%
Unspecified 5 11%
Student > Postgraduate 4 9%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 7%
Other 15 34%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 18 41%
Unspecified 7 16%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 6 14%
Psychology 5 11%
Social Sciences 2 5%
Other 6 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 12. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 June 2016.
All research outputs
#1,233,770
of 12,973,070 outputs
Outputs from British Journal of General Practice
#611
of 2,754 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#27,744
of 231,646 outputs
Outputs of similar age from British Journal of General Practice
#15
of 54 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,973,070 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,754 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 231,646 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 54 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.