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Prevalence and influencing factors of co-morbid depression in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a General Hospital based study

Overview of attention for article published in Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome, June 2015
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Title
Prevalence and influencing factors of co-morbid depression in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a General Hospital based study
Published in
Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome, June 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13098-015-0053-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Weijun Zhang, Huiwen Xu, Shuliang Zhao, Shinan Yin, Xiaohua Wang, Jing Guo, Shengfa Zhang, Huixuan Zhou, Fugang Wang, Linni Gu, Lei Zhu, Haibo Yu, Zhiyong Qu, Donghua Tian

Abstract

Depression and diabetes have been recognized as major public health issues in China, however, no studies to date examined the factors associated with the development of depression in patients with diabetes in China. This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of co-morbid depression among adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) and to examine the influence factors of co-morbid depression in a group of patients with type 2 DM. The study was conducted from March l to May 31, 2012, in the Department of Endocrinology of the First Affiliated Hospital of the General Hospital of the People's Liberation Army (PLA). A systematic random sample of 412 type 2 DM patients aged over 18 years was selected. A structured questionnaire was used for collecting the information about socio-demographic data, lifestyle factors and clinical characteristics. Depression and social support was evaluated by using the Chinese version of Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Social Support Rate Scale (SSRS), respectively. Weights and heights were measured. Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) was abstracted from each patient directly after the interview. Of the total sample, 142 patients had depression according to the BDI scores (BDI scores ≥14), the prevalence of co-morbid depression in this study population was 5.7 % (142/2500). Of which, 56 had major depression (BDI ≥ 21), and 86 had moderate depression (BDI ≥ 14&BDI < 21). Logistic regression analysis indicated that a high HbA1c level, a high BMI, low quality health insurance, and being single, were significantly associated with the development of depression. However, a family history of diabetes and a high social support level are likely protective factors. The prevalence of co-morbid depression was 5.7 % among Chinese subjects with type 2 DM in this study. High HbA1c level, high BMI score, being single, low social support level, and low quality health insurance were associated with the presence of depression. These findings support a recommendation for routine screening and management in China for depression in patients with diabetes, especially for those in primary care, to reduce the number of the depressed or the misrecognized depressed diabetic patients.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 63 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 63 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Postgraduate 10 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 13%
Student > Master 7 11%
Researcher 6 10%
Student > Bachelor 5 8%
Other 16 25%
Unknown 11 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 24 38%
Psychology 8 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 11%
Unspecified 3 5%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 2 3%
Other 5 8%
Unknown 14 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 June 2015.
All research outputs
#4,406,525
of 5,291,770 outputs
Outputs from Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome
#193
of 230 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#150,947
of 187,163 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome
#8
of 8 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,291,770 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 230 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.9. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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