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A circadian oscillator in the fungus Botrytis cinerea regulates virulence when infecting Arabidopsis thaliana

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, June 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (88th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (60th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
13 tweeters
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
f1000
1 research highlight platform

Citations

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35 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
90 Mendeley
Title
A circadian oscillator in the fungus Botrytis cinerea regulates virulence when infecting Arabidopsis thaliana
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, June 2015
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1508432112
Pubmed ID
Authors

Montserrat A. Hevia, Paulo Canessa, Hanna Müller-Esparza, Luis F. Larrondo

Abstract

The circadian clock of the plant model Arabidopsis thaliana modulates defense mechanisms impacting plant-pathogen interactions. Nevertheless, the effect of clock regulation on pathogenic traits has not been explored in detail. Moreover, molecular description of clocks in pathogenic fungi-or fungi in general other than the model ascomycete Neurospora crassa-has been neglected, leaving this type of question largely unaddressed. We sought to characterize, therefore, the circadian system of the plant pathogen Botrytis cinerea to assess if such oscillatory machinery can modulate its virulence potential. Herein, we show the existence of a functional clock in B. cinerea, which shares similar components and circuitry with the Neurospora circadian system, although we found that its core negative clock element FREQUENCY (BcFRQ1) serves additional roles, suggesting extracircadian functions for this protein. We observe that the lesions produced by this necrotrophic fungus on Arabidopsis leaves are smaller when the interaction between these two organisms occurs at dawn. Remarkably, this effect does not depend solely on the plant clock, but instead largely relies on the pathogen circadian system. Genetic disruption of the B. cinerea oscillator by mutation, overexpression of BcFRQ1, or by suppression of its rhythmicity by constant light, abrogates circadian regulation of fungal virulence. By conducting experiments with out-of-phase light:dark cycles, we confirm that indeed, it is the fungal clock that plays the main role in defining the outcome of the Arabidopsis-Botrytis interaction, providing to our knowledge the first evidence of a microbial clock modulating pathogenic traits at specific times of the day.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 13 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 90 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Japan 2 2%
United Kingdom 1 1%
Germany 1 1%
Austria 1 1%
Unknown 85 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 23 26%
Researcher 21 23%
Student > Master 15 17%
Student > Bachelor 14 16%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 7%
Other 11 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 63 70%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 17 19%
Unspecified 4 4%
Environmental Science 2 2%
Computer Science 1 1%
Other 3 3%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 12. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 April 2017.
All research outputs
#950,754
of 11,337,274 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#15,986
of 74,495 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#28,058
of 235,297 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#445
of 1,122 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,337,274 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 74,495 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 20.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 235,297 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1,122 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.