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Personal and social norms for food portion sizes in lean and obese adults

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Obesity, April 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (87th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (52nd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
16 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
53 Mendeley
Title
Personal and social norms for food portion sizes in lean and obese adults
Published in
International Journal of Obesity, April 2015
DOI 10.1038/ijo.2015.47
Pubmed ID
Authors

H B Lewis, S E Forwood, A L Ahern, K Verlaers, E Robinson, S Higgs, S A Jebb

Abstract

Portion size is an important component of dietary advice for weight control, but little is known about what portion sizes people consider 'normal'. This study determined the effect of BMI, gender, dietary restraint, and liking of the food on personal and social portion size norms for a range of foods, and the degree of certainty over the norms. 30 lean (BMI 20-25 kg/m(2)) and 30 obese (BMI 30-35 kg/m(2)) men and women (aged 18-60years) viewed 17 different portion sizes of 12 foods on a computer screen on two occasions a week apart. Participants responded 'more' or 'less' to each photograph reflecting personal portion size preference or perceived portion sizes of others. Personal and social norms for portion sizes of each food were determined using the method of constant stimuli giving a sigmoidal curve of the probability of answering 'less' over a range of portion sizes. The slope of the sigmoid at the norm gave a measure of certainty about the norm. Regression models were used to examine the effect of BMI, gender, dietary restraint and liking of the food on personal norms, social norms, the relationship between norms, and the slopes. Personal norms were significantly larger in the obese (P=0.026), men (P<0.001), those with lower dietary restraint (P<0.001), and those with higher liking for the food (P<0.001). Social norms were larger for women (P=0.012). The slopes at the norms were 30% shallower in the obese and in men (P<0.001). Larger personal norms for portion size among the obese, men, those with lower dietary restraint, and those with higher liking for a food imply greater consumption, which may undermine weight control. Shallower slopes for norms in the obese and in men may imply less clearly defined habitual portion sizes.International Journal of Obesity accepted article preview online, 14 April 2015. doi:10.1038/ijo.2015.47.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 53 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Canada 1 2%
Unknown 52 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 11 21%
Unspecified 8 15%
Student > Bachelor 7 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 9%
Other 15 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 14 26%
Unspecified 11 21%
Social Sciences 7 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 9%
Business, Management and Accounting 4 8%
Other 12 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 11. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 August 2015.
All research outputs
#1,195,372
of 12,346,542 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Obesity
#873
of 3,131 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#30,804
of 241,484 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Obesity
#45
of 92 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,346,542 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,131 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 17.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 241,484 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 92 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.