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Large Shift in Source of Fine Sediment in the Upper Mississippi River

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Science & Technology, September 2011
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (71st percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (67th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

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147 Dimensions

Readers on

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179 Mendeley
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Title
Large Shift in Source of Fine Sediment in the Upper Mississippi River
Published in
Environmental Science & Technology, September 2011
DOI 10.1021/es2019109
Pubmed ID
Authors

Patrick Belmont, Karen B. Gran, Shawn P. Schottler, Peter R. Wilcock, Stephanie S. Day, Carrie Jennings, J. Wesley Lauer, Enrica Viparelli, Jane K. Willenbring, Daniel R. Engstrom, Gary Parker

Abstract

Although sediment is a natural constituent of rivers, excess loading to rivers and streams is a leading cause of impairment and biodiversity loss. Remedial actions require identification of the sources and mechanisms of sediment supply. This task is complicated by the scale and complexity of large watersheds as well as changes in climate and land use that alter the drivers of sediment supply. Previous studies in Lake Pepin, a natural lake on the Mississippi River, indicate that sediment supply to the lake has increased 10-fold over the past 150 years. Herein we combine geochemical fingerprinting and a suite of geomorphic change detection techniques with a sediment mass balance for a tributary watershed to demonstrate that, although the sediment loading remains very large, the dominant source of sediment has shifted from agricultural soil erosion to accelerated erosion of stream banks and bluffs, driven by increased river discharge. Such hydrologic amplification of natural erosion processes calls for a new approach to watershed sediment modeling that explicitly accounts for channel and floodplain dynamics that amplify or dampen landscape processes. Further, this finding illustrates a new challenge in remediating nonpoint sediment pollution and indicates that management efforts must expand from soil erosion to factors contributing to increased water runoff.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 179 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 4 2%
France 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Belgium 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Unknown 170 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 42 23%
Student > Master 33 18%
Researcher 28 16%
Student > Bachelor 17 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 12 7%
Other 25 14%
Unknown 22 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Earth and Planetary Sciences 57 32%
Environmental Science 51 28%
Engineering 17 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 6%
Psychology 2 1%
Other 9 5%
Unknown 33 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 October 2011.
All research outputs
#1,883,098
of 5,028,713 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Science & Technology
#2,308
of 5,109 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#20,105
of 71,681 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Science & Technology
#32
of 100 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,028,713 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 62nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,109 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 71,681 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 100 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its contemporaries.