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Sex differences of leukocytes DNA methylation adjusted for estimated cellular proportions

Overview of attention for article published in Biology of Sex Differences, June 2015
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Title
Sex differences of leukocytes DNA methylation adjusted for estimated cellular proportions
Published in
Biology of Sex Differences, June 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13293-015-0029-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Masatoshi Inoshita, Shusuke Numata, Atsushi Tajima, Makoto Kinoshita, Hidehiro Umehara, Hidenaga Yamamori, Ryota Hashimoto, Issei Imoto, Tetsuro Ohmori

Abstract

DNA methylation, which is most frequently the transference of a methyl group to the 5-carbon position of the cytosine in a CpG dinucleotide, plays an important role in both normal development and diseases. To date, several genome-wide methylome studies have revealed sex-biased DNA methylation, yet no studies have investigated sex differences in DNA methylation by taking into account cellular heterogeneity. The aim of the present study was to investigate sex-biased DNA methylation on the autosomes in human blood by adjusting for estimated cellular proportions because cell-type proportions may vary by sex. We performed a genome-wide DNA methylation profiling of the peripheral leukocytes in two sets of samples, a discovery set (49 males and 44 females) and a replication set (14 males and 10 females) using Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChips for 485,764 CpG dinucleotides and then examined the effect of sex on DNA methylation with a multiple linear regression analysis after adjusting for age, the estimated 6 cell-type proportions, and the covariates identified in a surrogate variable analysis. We identified differential DNA methylation between males and females at 292 autosomal CpG site loci in the discovery set (Bonferroni-adjusted p < 0.05). Of these 292 CpG sites, significant sex differences were also observed at 98 sites in the replication set (p < 0.05). These findings provided further evidence that DNA methylation may play a role in the differentiation or maintenance of sexual dimorphisms. Our methylome mapping of the effects of sex may be useful to understanding the molecular mechanism involved in both normal development and diseases.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 41 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
New Zealand 1 2%
Belgium 1 2%
Unknown 39 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 20 49%
Researcher 3 7%
Student > Master 3 7%
Professor 3 7%
Student > Postgraduate 2 5%
Other 5 12%
Unknown 5 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 10 24%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 20%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 15%
Neuroscience 3 7%
Physics and Astronomy 1 2%
Other 6 15%
Unknown 7 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 July 2015.
All research outputs
#10,111,065
of 11,402,114 outputs
Outputs from Biology of Sex Differences
#165
of 181 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#194,084
of 236,153 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Biology of Sex Differences
#2
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,402,114 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 181 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.2. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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