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Receptionist rECognition and rEferral of Patients with Stroke (RECEPTS): unannounced simulated patient telephone call study in primary care

Overview of attention for article published in British Journal of General Practice, June 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (85th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
twitter
7 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

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6 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
23 Mendeley
Title
Receptionist rECognition and rEferral of Patients with Stroke (RECEPTS): unannounced simulated patient telephone call study in primary care
Published in
British Journal of General Practice, June 2015
DOI 10.3399/bjgp15x685621
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ruth M Mellor, James P Sheppard, Elizabeth Bates, George Bouliotis, Janet Jones, Satinder Singh, John Skelton, Connie Wiskin, Richard J McManus

Abstract

Stroke is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Timely recognition and referral are essential for treatment. To examine the ability of receptionists in general practices to recognise symptoms of stroke and direct patients to emergency care. Unannounced simulated patient telephone calls and prospective cross-sectional survey study in general practices in the Birmingham and Solihull area. A total of 52 general practices participated in a total of 520 simulated telephone calls, with 183 receptionists completing questionnaires. Logistic regression analyses were used to examine likelihood of referral for immediate care by ease of vignette recognition and number of common stroke symptoms present. General practice receptionists correctly referred 69% of simulated calls for immediate care. Calls classed as 'difficult' to recognise were less likely to be immediately referred. Compared with 'easy' calls: 'difficult' calls odds ratio (OR) 0.15, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.08 to 0.26; 'moderate' calls OR 0.55, 95% CI = 0.32 to 0.92. Similarly, calls including one or two 'FAST' symptoms were less likely to be referred immediately (compared with three FAST symptoms: one symptom OR 0.30, 95% CI = 0.13 to 0.72; two symptoms OR 0.35, 95% CI = 0.15 to 0.83). General practice receptionists refer patients with stroke for immediate care when they present with several symptoms; however, they are less likely to refer patients presenting with only one symptom or less common symptoms of stroke. Optimum management of acute stroke in primary care requires interventions that improve receptionists' knowledge of lesser-known stroke symptoms.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 23 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 4%
Unknown 22 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 6 26%
Other 4 17%
Student > Bachelor 3 13%
Student > Master 3 13%
Librarian 3 13%
Other 4 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 9 39%
Unspecified 6 26%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 13%
Social Sciences 2 9%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 4%
Other 2 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 22. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 October 2016.
All research outputs
#716,972
of 13,280,207 outputs
Outputs from British Journal of General Practice
#386
of 2,850 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#15,926
of 231,957 outputs
Outputs of similar age from British Journal of General Practice
#8
of 55 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,280,207 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,850 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.2. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 231,957 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 55 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.