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The Effects of Dominance on Leadership and Energetic Gain: A Dynamic Game between Pairs of Social Foragers

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS Computational Biology, October 2011
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (68th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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2 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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12 Dimensions

Readers on

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26 Mendeley
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2 CiteULike
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Title
The Effects of Dominance on Leadership and Energetic Gain: A Dynamic Game between Pairs of Social Foragers
Published in
PLoS Computational Biology, October 2011
DOI 10.1371/journal.pcbi.1002252
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sean A. Rands

Abstract

Although social behaviour can bring many benefits to an individual, there are also costs that may be incurred whenever the members of a social group interact. The formation of dominance hierarchies could offer a means of reducing some of the costs of social interaction, but individuals within the hierarchy may end up paying differing costs dependent upon their position within the hierarchy. These differing interaction costs may therefore influence the behaviour of the group, as subordinate individuals may experience very different benefits and costs to dominants when the group is conducting a given behaviour. Here, a state-dependent dynamic game is described which considers a pair of social foragers where there is a set dominance relationship within the pair. The model considers the case where the subordinate member of the pair pays an interference cost when it and the dominant individual conduct specific pairs of behaviours together. The model demonstrates that if the subordinate individual pays these energetic costs when it interacts with the dominant individual, this has effects upon the behaviour of both subordinate and the dominant individuals. Including interaction costs increases the amount of foraging behaviour both individuals conduct, with the behaviour of the pair being driven by the subordinate individual. The subordinate will tend to be the lighter individual for longer periods of time when interaction costs are imposed. This supports earlier suggestions that lighter individuals should act as the decision-maker within the pair, giving leadership-like behaviours that are based upon energetic state. Pre-existing properties of individuals such as their dominance will be less important for determining which individual makes the decisions for the pair. This suggests that, even with strict behavioural hierarchies, identifying which individual is the dominant one is not sufficient for identifying which one is the leader.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 26 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Australia 1 4%
United Kingdom 1 4%
Brazil 1 4%
United States 1 4%
Unknown 22 85%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 7 27%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 15%
Student > Bachelor 4 15%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 3 12%
Student > Master 2 8%
Other 6 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 18 69%
Computer Science 1 4%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 4%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 4%
Mathematics 1 4%
Other 4 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 October 2011.
All research outputs
#2,055,760
of 5,038,248 outputs
Outputs from PLoS Computational Biology
#1,984
of 3,200 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#22,072
of 71,644 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS Computational Biology
#54
of 106 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,038,248 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 58th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,200 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.7. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 71,644 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 106 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.