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Effects of high doses of vitamin D3 on mucosa-associated gut microbiome vary between regions of the human gastrointestinal tract.

Overview of attention for article published in European Journal of Nutrition, July 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#12 of 1,072)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
4 news outlets
twitter
286 tweeters
facebook
53 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user
reddit
1 Redditor

Readers on

mendeley
49 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Effects of high doses of vitamin D3 on mucosa-associated gut microbiome vary between regions of the human gastrointestinal tract.
Published in
European Journal of Nutrition, July 2015
DOI 10.1007/s00394-015-0966-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Bashir, Mina, Prietl, Barbara, Tauschmann, Martin, Mautner, Selma I, Kump, Patrizia K, Treiber, Gerlies, Wurm, Philipp, Gorkiewicz, Gregor, Högenauer, Christoph, Pieber, Thomas R, Mina Bashir, Barbara Prietl, Martin Tauschmann, Selma I. Mautner, Patrizia K. Kump, Gerlies Treiber, Philipp Wurm, Gregor Gorkiewicz, Christoph Högenauer, Thomas R. Pieber

Abstract

Vitamin D is well known for its effects on bone mineralisation but has also been attributed immunomodulatory properties. It positively influences human health, but in vivo data describing vitamin D effects on the human gut microbiome are missing. We aimed to investigate the effects of oral vitamin D3 supplementation on the human mucosa-associated and stool microbiome as well as CD8(+) T cells in healthy volunteers. This was an interventional, open-label, pilot study. Sixteen healthy volunteers (7 females, 9 males) were endoscopically examined to access a total of 7 sites. We sampled stomach, small bowel, colon, and stools before and after 8 weeks of vitamin D3 supplementation. Bacterial composition was assessed by pyrosequencing the 16S rRNA gene (V1-2), and CD8(+) T cell counts were determined by flow cytometry. Vitamin D3 supplementation changed the gut microbiome in the upper GI tract (gastric corpus, antrum, and duodenum). We found a decreased relative abundance of Gammaproteobacteria including Pseudomonas spp. and Escherichia/Shigella spp. and increased bacterial richness. No major changes occurred in the terminal ileum, appendiceal orifice, ascending colon, and sigmoid colon or in stools, but the CD8(+) T cell fraction was significantly increased in the terminal ileum. Vitamin D3 modulates the gut microbiome of the upper GI tract which might explain its positive influence on gastrointestinal diseases, such as inflammatory bowel disease or bacterial infections. The local effects of vitamin D demonstrate pronounced regional differences in the response of the GI microbiome to external factors, which should be considered in future studies investigating the human microbiome.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 286 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 49 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 1 2%
Colombia 1 2%
Unknown 47 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 18%
Researcher 9 18%
Student > Bachelor 6 12%
Student > Master 5 10%
Student > Postgraduate 3 6%
Other 6 12%
Unknown 11 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 14 29%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 16%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 14%
Unspecified 2 4%
Chemical Engineering 1 2%
Other 6 12%
Unknown 11 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 272. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 January 2018.
All research outputs
#28,387
of 9,093,557 outputs
Outputs from European Journal of Nutrition
#12
of 1,072 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#853
of 232,752 outputs
Outputs of similar age from European Journal of Nutrition
#1
of 43 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,093,557 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,072 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 232,752 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 43 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.