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Improving antimicrobial prescribing in Irish primary care through electronic data collection and surveillance: a feasibility study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Family Practice, July 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (75th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (56th percentile)

Mentioned by

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6 tweeters

Citations

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4 Dimensions

Readers on

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50 Mendeley
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Title
Improving antimicrobial prescribing in Irish primary care through electronic data collection and surveillance: a feasibility study
Published in
BMC Family Practice, July 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12875-015-0280-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sandra Galvin, Aoife Callan, Martin Cormican, Sinead Duane, Kathleen Bennett, Andrew W. Murphy, Akke Vellinga

Abstract

The increase in the spread of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in bacterial pathogens and limited availability of new antimicrobials places immense pressure on general practitioners (GPs) to prescribe appropriately. Currently, electronic antimicrobial prescribing data is not routinely collected from GPs in Ireland for surveillance purposes to assess regional specific fluctuations or trends in antimicrobial prescribing. The current study aimed to address this issue by assessing the feasibility of remotely extracting antimicrobial prescribing data from primary care practices in Ireland, for the purpose of assessing prescribing quality using the European Surveillance of Antimicrobial Consumption (ESAC) drug specific quality indicators. Participating practices (n = 30) uploaded data to the Irish Primary Care Research Network (IPCRN). The IPCRN data extraction facility is integrated within the practice patient management software system and permitted the extraction of anonymised patient prescriptions for a one year period, from October 2012 to October 2013. The quality of antimicrobial prescribing was evaluated using the twelve ESAC drug specific quality indicators using the defined daily dose (DDD) per 1,000 inhabitants per day (DID) methodology. National and European prescribing surveillance data (based on total pharmacy sales) was obtained for a comparative analysis. Antimicrobial prescriptions (n = 57,079) for 27,043 patients were obtained from the thirty study practices for a one year period. On average, study practices prescribed a greater proportion of quinolones (37 % increase), in summer compared with winter months, a variation which was not observed in national and European data. In comparison with national data, study practices prescribed higher proportions of β-lactamase-sensitive penicillins (4.98 % vs. 4.3 %) and a greater use of broad spectrum compared to narrow-spectrum antimicrobials (ratio = 9.98 vs. 6.26) was observed. Study practices exceeded the European mean for prescribing combinations of penicillins, including β-lactamase inhibitors. This research demonstrates the feasibility and potential use of direct data extraction of anonymised practice data directly through the patient management software system. The data extraction methods described can facilitate the provision of routinely collected data for sustained and inclusive surveillance of antimicrobial prescribing. These comparisons may initiate further improvements in antimicrobial prescribing practices by identifying potential areas for improvement.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 50 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Ireland 2 4%
Unknown 48 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 14 28%
Researcher 8 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 12%
Student > Bachelor 5 10%
Student > Postgraduate 4 8%
Other 6 12%
Unknown 7 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 28%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 10 20%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 10%
Computer Science 3 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 4%
Other 7 14%
Unknown 9 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 July 2015.
All research outputs
#2,166,432
of 9,722,866 outputs
Outputs from BMC Family Practice
#350
of 1,072 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#57,931
of 234,390 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Family Practice
#16
of 37 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,722,866 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 77th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,072 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 234,390 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 37 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its contemporaries.