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FOXL2 modulates cartilage, skeletal development and IGF1-dependent growth in mice

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Developmental Biology, July 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#27 of 205)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (83rd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (62nd percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

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14 Dimensions

Readers on

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31 Mendeley
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Title
FOXL2 modulates cartilage, skeletal development and IGF1-dependent growth in mice
Published in
BMC Developmental Biology, July 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12861-015-0072-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mara Marongiu, Loredana Marcia, Emanuele Pelosi, Mario Lovicu, Manila Deiana, Yonqing Zhang, Alessandro Puddu, Angela Loi, Manuela Uda, Antonino Forabosco, David Schlessinger, Laura Crisponi

Abstract

Haploinsufficiency of the FOXL2 transcription factor in humans causes Blepharophimosis/Ptosis/Epicanthus Inversus syndrome (BPES), characterized by eyelid anomalies and premature ovarian failure. Mice lacking Foxl2 recapitulate human eyelid/forehead defects and undergo female gonadal dysgenesis. We report here that mice lacking Foxl2 also show defects in postnatal growth and embryonic bone and cartilage formation. Foxl2 (-/-) male mice at different stages of development have been characterized and compared to wild type. Body length and weight were measured and growth curves were created. Skeletons were stained with alcian blue and/or alizarin red. Bone and cartilage formation was analyzed by Von Kossa staining and immunofluorescence using anti-FOXL2 and anti-SOX9 antibodies followed by confocal microscopy. Genes differentially expressed in skull vaults were evaluated by microarray analysis. Analysis of the GH/IGF1 pathway was done evaluating the expression of several hypothalamic-pituitary-bone axis markers by RT-qPCR. Compared to wild-type, Foxl2 null mice are smaller and show skeletal abnormalities and defects in cartilage and bone mineralization, with down-regulation of the GH/IGF1 axis. Consistent with these effects, we find FOXL2 expressed in embryos at 9.5 dpc in neural tube epithelium, in head mesenchyme near the neural tube, and within the first branchial arch; then, starting at 12.5 dpc, expressed in cartilaginous tissue; and at PO and P7, in hypothalamus. Our results support FOXL2 as a master transcription factor in a spectrum of developmental processes, including growth, cartilage and bone formation. Its action overlaps that of SOX9, though they are antagonistic in female vs male gonadal sex determination but conjoint in cartilage and skeletal development.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 31 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 31 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 19%
Researcher 6 19%
Student > Master 6 19%
Student > Postgraduate 3 10%
Student > Bachelor 2 6%
Other 4 13%
Unknown 4 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 11 35%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 19%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 16%
Mathematics 1 3%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 3%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 6 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 December 2015.
All research outputs
#873,157
of 6,886,791 outputs
Outputs from BMC Developmental Biology
#27
of 205 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#37,727
of 223,518 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Developmental Biology
#3
of 8 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,886,791 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 87th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 205 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.2. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 223,518 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 8 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 5 of them.