↓ Skip to main content

Transposable elements, mRNA expression level and strand-specificity of small RNAs are associated with non-additive inheritance of gene expression in hybrid plants

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Plant Biology, July 2015
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
8 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
32 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Transposable elements, mRNA expression level and strand-specificity of small RNAs are associated with non-additive inheritance of gene expression in hybrid plants
Published in
BMC Plant Biology, July 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12870-015-0549-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Qing Li, Ying Li, Stephen P. Moose, Matthew E. Hudson

Abstract

Gene expression inheritance patterns in Arabidopsis hybrid plants were investigated for correlation with the presence of transposable elements (TEs) and small RNA profile. The presence of TEs in a gene and the expression of small RNA matching a gene were both found to be associated with non-additive mRNA inheritance patterns in hybrids. Expression levels below mid-parent values in the hybrids were associated with low mRNA expression in parents, with the presence of small RNA from both strands, and with the presence of TEs. High-parent dominance of mRNA levels was found to be associated with high parental mRNA expression levels, the absence of TEs, and for some genes, with small RNA fragments that are predominantly from the sense strand. These small RNAs exhibit a broader size distribution than siRNA and reduced nucleotide end bias, which are consistent with an origin from degraded mRNA. Thus, increased as well as decreased gene expression in hybrids relative to the parental mean is associated with gene expression levels, TE presence and small RNA fragments with differing characteristics. The data presented here is consistent with a role for differential mRNA decay kinetics as one mechanism contributing to high-parent dominance in gene expression. Our evidence is also consistent with trans repression by siRNA and TEs as the cause of low-parent dominance.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 32 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Netherlands 1 3%
Brazil 1 3%
Sweden 1 3%
New Zealand 1 3%
China 1 3%
United States 1 3%
Unknown 26 81%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 31%
Researcher 9 28%
Student > Master 4 13%
Professor 3 9%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 1 3%
Other 4 13%
Unknown 1 3%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 23 72%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 16%
Social Sciences 1 3%
Unknown 3 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 July 2015.
All research outputs
#7,734,322
of 12,378,406 outputs
Outputs from BMC Plant Biology
#744
of 1,540 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#128,142
of 241,602 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Plant Biology
#41
of 67 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,378,406 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,540 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.2. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 241,602 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 67 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.