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A structured assessment of emergency and acute care providers in Afghanistan during the current conflict

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Emergency Medicine, July 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (56th percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters
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2 Facebook pages

Citations

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1 Dimensions

Readers on

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19 Mendeley
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Title
A structured assessment of emergency and acute care providers in Afghanistan during the current conflict
Published in
International Journal of Emergency Medicine, July 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12245-015-0069-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Leeda Rashid, Edris Afzali, Ross Donaldson, Paul Lazar, Raghnild Bundesmann, Samra Rashid

Abstract

Afghanistan has struggled with several decades of well-documented conflict, increasing the importance of providing emergency services to its citizens. However, little is known about the country's capacity to provide such care. Three native-speaking Afghan-American physicians performed an assessment of emergency care via combined quantitative and qualitative survey tools. Hospitals in Kabul, Afghanistan were selected based on probability proportional to size methodology, in which size was derived from prior work in the country and permission granted by the administering agency and the Ministry of Health. A written survey was given to physicians and nurses, followed by structured focus groups, and multiple days of observation per facility. A descriptive analysis was performed and data analyzed through a combination of variables in eight overarching categories relevant to emergency care. One hundred twenty-five surveys were completed from 9 hospitals. One third of respondents (32.8 %) worked full time in the emergency departments, with another 28.8 % working there at least three quarters of the time. Over 63 % of providers believed that the greatest delay for care in emergencies was in the prehospital setting. Differences were noted among the various types of facilities when looking at specific components of emergency care such as skill level of workers, frequencies of assaults in the hospitals, and other domains of service provision. Sum of squares between the different facility types were highest for areas of skill (SS = 210.3; p = .001), confidence in the system (SS = 156.5; p < .005), assault (SS = 487.6; p < .005), and feeling safe in the emergency departments (SS = 193.1, p < .005). Confidence negatively correlated to frequency of assaults (Pearson r = -.33; p < .005) but positively correlated with feeling safe (Pearson r = .51; p < .005) and reliability of equipment (Pearson r = .48; p < .005). The only correlation for access to services was prehospital care (Pearson r = .72, p < .005). There is a significant need to provide emergency care services in Afghanistan, specifically prehospital care. High variability exists among facility-type in various components of emergency services provision.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 19 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 19 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 3 16%
Researcher 3 16%
Student > Postgraduate 2 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 11%
Student > Bachelor 2 11%
Other 2 11%
Unknown 5 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 4 21%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 16%
Computer Science 2 11%
Psychology 2 11%
Business, Management and Accounting 2 11%
Other 1 5%
Unknown 5 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 July 2015.
All research outputs
#8,615,864
of 15,641,217 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Emergency Medicine
#247
of 449 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#97,073
of 233,922 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Emergency Medicine
#2
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,641,217 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 449 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.2. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 233,922 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.