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Climatic controls on ecosystem resilience: Postfire regeneration in the Cape Floristic Region of South Africa

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, July 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (80th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
3 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
12 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Readers on

mendeley
22 Mendeley
Title
Climatic controls on ecosystem resilience: Postfire regeneration in the Cape Floristic Region of South Africa
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, July 2015
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1416710112
Pubmed ID
Authors

Adam M. Wilson, Andrew M. Latimer, John A. Silander

Abstract

Conservation of biodiversity and natural resources in a changing climate requires understanding what controls ecosystem resilience to disturbance. This understanding is especially important in the fire-prone Mediterranean systems of the world. The fire frequency in these systems is sensitive to climate, and recent climate change has resulted in more frequent fires over the last few decades. However, the sensitivity of postfire recovery and biomass/fuel load accumulation to climate is less well understood than fire frequency despite its importance in driving the fire regime. In this study, we develop a hierarchical statistical framework to model postfire ecosystem recovery using satellite-derived observations of vegetation as a function of stand age, topography, and climate. In the Cape Floristic Region (CFR) of South Africa, a fire-prone biodiversity hotspot, we found strong postfire recovery gradients associated with climate resulting in faster recovery in regions with higher soil fertility, minimum July (winter) temperature, and mean January (summer) precipitation. Projections using an ensemble of 11 downscaled Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) general circulation models (GCMs) suggest that warmer winter temperatures in 2080-2100 will encourage faster postfire recovery across the region, which could further increase fire frequency due to faster fuel accumulation. However, some models project decreasing precipitation in the western CFR, which would slow recovery rates there, likely reducing fire frequency through lack of fuel and potentially driving local biome shifts from fynbos shrubland to nonburning semidesert vegetation. This simple yet powerful approach to making inferences from large, remotely sensed datasets has potential for wide application to modeling ecosystem resilience in disturbance-prone ecosystems globally.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 12 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 22 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
South Africa 2 9%
United States 1 5%
Unknown 19 86%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 36%
Researcher 8 36%
Student > Master 2 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 9%
Professor 1 5%
Other 1 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 41%
Environmental Science 8 36%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 3 14%
Unspecified 2 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 38. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 December 2015.
All research outputs
#172,577
of 6,756,570 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#4,785
of 41,427 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#8,263
of 220,837 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#201
of 1,009 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,756,570 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 41,427 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 21.6. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 220,837 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1,009 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.