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Parent distress reactions following a serious illness or injury in their child: a protocol paper for the take a breath cohort study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Psychiatry, July 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (91st percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

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27 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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15 Dimensions

Readers on

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96 Mendeley
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Title
Parent distress reactions following a serious illness or injury in their child: a protocol paper for the take a breath cohort study
Published in
BMC Psychiatry, July 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12888-015-0519-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Frank Muscara, Kylie Burke, Maria C McCarthy, Vicki A Anderson, Stephen JC Hearps, Simone J Hearps, Anica Dimovski, Jan M Nicholson

Abstract

Diagnosis of life threatening childhood illness or injury can lead to significant distress reactions in parents, with many experiencing clinically significant levels of post-traumatic stress symptoms. These symptoms can have long-term adverse impacts on parent mental health, family functioning, and the adjustment of the ill child. Independent studies have found such reactions in several different illness groups. However, very little research has systematically compared the prevalence, impact and trajectories over time of post-traumatic stress symptoms in parents across different childhood illness groups with an acute life threat. The current study seeks to map the course of post-traumatic stress reactions in parents of children with various life threatening illnesses over an 18 month period, and identify factors that predict successful adaptation in families. The current study described is of a prospective, longitudinal design. The sample included parents of children admitted to four major hospital departments at the Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, Australia, for a life threatening illness or injury. Eligible parents were those who were caregivers of children aged 0-to 18-years admitted to the Oncology, Cardiology, Neurology and Pediatric Intensive Care Unit. Parents were recruited acutely, and completed self-report questionnaires at four time-points: within the first 4 weeks (T1:); then at 4 months (T2); 7 months (T3); and 19 months (T4) after admission. Questionnaires assessed parent and child mental health and wellbeing, and a number of risk and reliance factors such child illness factors, parent demographic factors, and psychosocial factors. This study is one of the first to document the trajectory of post-traumatic stress responses in parents of very ill children, across illness groups. Given that it will also identify risk and resilience factors, and map the course of parent outcomes over an 18 monthperiod, it has the potential to inform novel strategies for intervention.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 27 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 96 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 96 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 23 24%
Student > Master 17 18%
Student > Doctoral Student 16 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 15%
Unspecified 7 7%
Other 19 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 31 32%
Medicine and Dentistry 21 22%
Nursing and Health Professions 16 17%
Unspecified 15 16%
Social Sciences 6 6%
Other 7 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 17. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 August 2017.
All research outputs
#805,207
of 12,356,037 outputs
Outputs from BMC Psychiatry
#291
of 2,869 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#20,794
of 235,604 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Psychiatry
#4
of 77 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,356,037 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,869 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.8. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 235,604 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 77 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.