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Climate change impacts on bumblebees converge across continents

Overview of attention for article published in Science, July 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
54 news outlets
blogs
20 blogs
twitter
363 tweeters
facebook
29 Facebook pages
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
googleplus
15 Google+ users

Readers on

mendeley
375 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Climate change impacts on bumblebees converge across continents
Published in
Science, July 2015
DOI 10.1126/science.aaa7031
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jeremy T. Kerr, Alana Pindar, Paul Galpern, Laurence Packer, Simon G. Potts, Stuart M. Roberts, Pierre Rasmont, Oliver Schweiger, Sheila R. Colla, Leif L. Richardson, David L. Wagner, Lawrence F. Gall, Derek S. Sikes, Alberto Pantoja, Kerr, Jeremy T, Pindar, Alana, Galpern, Paul, Packer, Laurence, Potts, Simon G, Roberts, Stuart M, Rasmont, Pierre, Schweiger, Oliver, Colla, Sheila R, Richardson, Leif L, Wagner, David L, Gall, Lawrence F, Sikes, Derek S, Pantoja, Alberto

Abstract

For many species, geographical ranges are expanding toward the poles in response to climate change, while remaining stable along range edges nearest the equator. Using long-term observations across Europe and North America over 110 years, we tested for climate change-related range shifts in bumblebee species across the full extents of their latitudinal and thermal limits and movements along elevation gradients. We found cross-continentally consistent trends in failures to track warming through time at species' northern range limits, range losses from southern range limits, and shifts to higher elevations among southern species. These effects are independent of changing land uses or pesticide applications and underscore the need to test for climate impacts at both leading and trailing latitudinal and thermal limits for species.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 363 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 375 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 8 2%
France 4 1%
United Kingdom 4 1%
Denmark 3 <1%
Germany 2 <1%
Chile 2 <1%
Brazil 2 <1%
Canada 2 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Other 10 3%
Unknown 337 90%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 86 23%
Researcher 72 19%
Student > Master 67 18%
Student > Bachelor 50 13%
Professor > Associate Professor 22 6%
Other 78 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 234 62%
Environmental Science 79 21%
Unspecified 26 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 12 3%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 11 3%
Other 13 3%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 848. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 May 2018.
All research outputs
#3,649
of 10,623,464 outputs
Outputs from Science
#195
of 50,298 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#77
of 231,957 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Science
#3
of 760 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 10,623,464 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 50,298 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 33.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 231,957 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 760 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.