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Identifying avian malaria vectors: sampling methods influence outcomes

Overview of attention for article published in Parasites & Vectors, July 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (57th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (57th percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 tweeter
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

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15 Dimensions

Readers on

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73 Mendeley
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Title
Identifying avian malaria vectors: sampling methods influence outcomes
Published in
Parasites & Vectors, July 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13071-015-0969-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jenny S. Carlson, Erika Walther, Rebecca TroutFryxell, Sarah Staley, Lisa A. Tell, Ravinder N. M. Sehgal, Christopher M. Barker, Anthony J. Cornel

Abstract

The role of vectors in the transmission of avian malaria parasites is currently understudied. Many studies that investigate parasite-vector relationships use limited trapping techniques and/or identify potential competent vectors in the field in such ways that cannot distinguish between an infected or infectious vector. Without the use of multiple trapping techniques that address the specific biology of diverse mosquito species, and without looking at the infection status of individual mosquitoes, it is not possible to make dependable conclusions on the role of mosquitoes in the transmission of avian malaria parasites. We conducted two years of mosquito collections at a riparian preserve in California where a wide diversity of species were collected with multiple trap types. We hypothesized that competent mosquito species can influence the distribution and diversity of avian malaria parasites by acting as a compatibility filter for specific Plasmodium species. To determine the infection status of all individual mosquitoes for Plasmodium species/lineages, amplification within the cytochrome b gene was carried out on over 3000 individual mosquito thoraxes, and for those that tested positive we then repeated the same process for abdomens and salivary glands. Our data show heterogeneity in the transmissibility of Plasmodium among ornithophillic mosquito species. More specifically, Culex stigmatosoma appears to not be a vector of Plasmodium homopolare, a parasite that is prevalent in the avian population, but is a vector of multiple other Plasmodium species/lineages. Our results suggest that conclusions made on the role of vectors from studies that do not use different mosquito trapping methods should be re-evaluated with caution, as we documented the potential for trapping biases, which may cause studies to miss important roles of specific mosquito species in the transmission of avian malaria. Moreover, we document heterogeneity in the transmission of Plasmodium spp. by mosquitoes can influence Plasmodium diversity and prevalence in specific locations to Plasmodium-vector incompatibilities.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 73 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Lithuania 1 1%
Brazil 1 1%
Unknown 69 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 20 27%
Student > Bachelor 17 23%
Student > Master 9 12%
Researcher 9 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 8%
Other 12 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 47 64%
Environmental Science 8 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 5%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 4%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 2 3%
Other 5 7%
Unknown 4 5%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 March 2016.
All research outputs
#6,490,979
of 12,011,028 outputs
Outputs from Parasites & Vectors
#1,182
of 3,032 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#94,359
of 235,392 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Parasites & Vectors
#42
of 111 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,011,028 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,032 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 235,392 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 111 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.