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δ15N constraints on long-term nitrogen balances in temperate forests

Overview of attention for article published in Oecologia, May 2011
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Title
δ15N constraints on long-term nitrogen balances in temperate forests
Published in
Oecologia, May 2011
DOI 10.1007/s00442-011-2016-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Steven S. Perakis, Emily R. Sinkhorn, Jana E. Compton

Abstract

Biogeochemical theory emphasizes nitrogen (N) limitation and the many factors that can restrict N accumulation in temperate forests, yet lacks a working model of conditions that can promote naturally high N accumulation. We used a dynamic simulation model of ecosystem N and δ(15)N to evaluate which combination of N input and loss pathways could produce a range of high ecosystem N contents characteristic of forests in the Oregon Coast Range. Total ecosystem N at nine study sites ranged from 8,788 to 22,667 kg ha(-1) and carbon (C) ranged from 188 to 460 Mg ha(-1), with highest values near the coast. Ecosystem δ(15)N displayed a curvilinear relationship with ecosystem N content, and largely reflected mineral soil, which accounted for 96-98% of total ecosystem N. Model simulations of ecosystem N balances parameterized with field rates of N leaching required long-term average N inputs that exceed atmospheric deposition and asymbiotic and epiphytic N(2)-fixation, and that were consistent with cycles of post-fire N(2)-fixation by early-successional red alder. Soil water δ(15)NO(3)(-) patterns suggested a shift in relative N losses from denitrification to nitrate leaching as N accumulated, and simulations identified nitrate leaching as the primary N loss pathway that constrains maximum N accumulation. Whereas current theory emphasizes constraints on biological N(2)-fixation and disturbance-mediated N losses as factors that limit N accumulation in temperate forests, our results suggest that wildfire can foster substantial long-term N accumulation in ecosystems that are colonized by symbiotic N(2)-fixing vegetation.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 103 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 4 4%
Argentina 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Unknown 94 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 23 22%
Researcher 22 21%
Student > Master 17 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 6%
Professor > Associate Professor 6 6%
Other 18 17%
Unknown 11 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 32 31%
Environmental Science 31 30%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 18 17%
Social Sciences 2 2%
Arts and Humanities 1 <1%
Other 3 3%
Unknown 16 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 October 2011.
All research outputs
#2,018,783
of 3,626,769 outputs
Outputs from Oecologia
#834
of 1,289 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#26,758
of 67,318 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Oecologia
#10
of 20 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 3,626,769 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,289 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.2. This one is in the 7th percentile – i.e., 7% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 67,318 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 20 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.