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Regulation of Sialic Acid Catabolism by the DNA Binding Protein NanR in Escherichia coli

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Bacteriology, August 2003
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (59th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (64th percentile)

Mentioned by

patent
2 patents

Citations

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54 Dimensions

Readers on

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46 Mendeley
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Title
Regulation of Sialic Acid Catabolism by the DNA Binding Protein NanR in Escherichia coli
Published in
Journal of Bacteriology, August 2003
DOI 10.1128/jb.185.16.4806-4815.2003
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kathryn A. Kalivoda, Susan M. Steenbergen, Eric R. Vimr, Jacqueline Plumbridge

Abstract

All Escherichia coli strains so far examined possess a chromosomally encoded nanATEK-yhcH operon for the catabolism of sialic acids. These unique nine-carbon sugars are synthesized primarily by higher eukaryotes and can be used as carbon, nitrogen, and energy sources by a variety of microbial pathogens or commensals. The gene nanR, located immediately upstream of the operon, encodes a protein of the FadR/GntR family that represses nan expression in trans. S1 analysis identified the nan transcriptional start, and DNA footprint analysis showed that NanR binds to a region of approximately 30 bp covering the promoter region. Native (nondenaturing) polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, mass spectrometry, and chemical cross-linking indicated that NanR forms homodimers in solution. The region protected by NanR contains three tandem repeats of the hexameric sequence GGTATA. Gel shift analysis with purified hexahistidine-tagged or native NanR detected three retarded complexes, suggesting that NanR binds sequentially to the three repeats. Artificial operators carrying different numbers of repeats formed the corresponding number of complexes. Among the sugars tested that were predicted to be products of the nan-encoded system, only the exogenous addition of sialic acid resulted in the dramatic induction of a chromosomal nanA-lacZ fusion or displaced NanR from its operator in vitro. Titration of NanR by the nan promoter region or artificial operators carrying different numbers of the GGTATA repeat on plasmids in this fusion strain supported the binding of the regulator to target DNA in vivo. Together, the results indicate that GGTATA is important for NanR binding, but the precise mechanism remains to be determined.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 46 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 2%
Canada 1 2%
Unknown 44 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 11 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 20%
Student > Master 6 13%
Professor 5 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 9%
Other 7 15%
Unknown 4 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 21 46%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 12 26%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 4%
Environmental Science 1 2%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 2%
Other 2 4%
Unknown 7 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 November 2017.
All research outputs
#4,479,364
of 14,605,083 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Bacteriology
#3,725
of 11,300 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#106,220
of 276,902 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Bacteriology
#23
of 65 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,605,083 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 11,300 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.4. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 276,902 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 65 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.