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Hostile attributional bias and aggressive behavior in global context

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, July 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (88th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
6 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
9 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
54 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
116 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Hostile attributional bias and aggressive behavior in global context
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, July 2015
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1418572112
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kenneth A. Dodge, Patrick S. Malone, Jennifer E. Lansford, Emma Sorbring, Ann T. Skinner, Sombat Tapanya, Liliana Maria Uribe Tirado, Arnaldo Zelli, Liane Peña Alampay, Suha M. Al-Hassan, Dario Bacchini, Anna Silvia Bombi, Marc H. Bornstein, Lei Chang, Kirby Deater-Deckard, Laura Di Giunta, Paul Oburu, Concetta Pastorelli

Abstract

We tested a model that children's tendency to attribute hostile intent to others in response to provocation is a key psychological process that statistically accounts for individual differences in reactive aggressive behavior and that this mechanism contributes to global group differences in children's chronic aggressive behavior problems. Participants were 1,299 children (mean age at year 1 = 8.3 y; 51% girls) from 12 diverse ecological-context groups in nine countries worldwide, followed across 4 y. In year 3, each child was presented with each of 10 hypothetical vignettes depicting an ambiguous provocation toward the child and was asked to attribute the likely intent of the provocateur (coded as benign or hostile) and to predict his or her own behavioral response (coded as nonaggression or reactive aggression). Mothers and children independently rated the child's chronic aggressive behavior problems in years 2, 3, and 4. In every ecological group, in those situations in which a child attributed hostile intent to a peer, that child was more likely to report that he or she would respond with reactive aggression than in situations when that same child attributed benign intent. Across children, hostile attributional bias scores predicted higher mother- and child-rated chronic aggressive behavior problems, even controlling for prior aggression. Ecological group differences in the tendency for children to attribute hostile intent statistically accounted for a significant portion of group differences in chronic aggressive behavior problems. The findings suggest a psychological mechanism for group differences in aggressive behavior and point to potential interventions to reduce aggressive behavior.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 116 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Hungary 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 114 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 23 20%
Student > Master 18 16%
Researcher 17 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 13 11%
Student > Bachelor 11 9%
Other 21 18%
Unknown 13 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 58 50%
Social Sciences 12 10%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 5%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 3%
Neuroscience 3 3%
Other 13 11%
Unknown 20 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 73. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 December 2019.
All research outputs
#280,334
of 15,149,790 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#5,973
of 84,458 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#4,957
of 232,372 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#113
of 950 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,149,790 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 84,458 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 26.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 232,372 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 950 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.