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Priority threat management of invasive animals to protect biodiversity under climate change

Overview of attention for article published in Global Change Biology, August 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (83rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
1 blog
twitter
27 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
18 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
95 Mendeley
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Title
Priority threat management of invasive animals to protect biodiversity under climate change
Published in
Global Change Biology, August 2015
DOI 10.1111/gcb.13034
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jennifer Firn, Ramona Maggini, Iadine Chadès, Sam Nicol, Belinda Walters, Andy Reeson, Tara G. Martin, Hugh P. Possingham, Jean-Baptiste Pichancourt, Rocio Ponce-Reyes, Josie Carwardine

Abstract

Climate change is a major threat to global biodiversity and its impacts can act synergistically to heighten the severity of other threats. Most research on projecting species range shifts under climate change has not been translated to informing priority management strategies on the ground. We develop a prioritization framework to assess strategies for managing threats to biodiversity under climate change and apply it to the management of invasive animal species across one sixth of the Australian continent, the Lake Eyre Basin. We collected information from key stakeholders and experts on the impacts of invasive animals on 148 of the region's most threatened species and 11 potential strategies. Assisted by models of current distributions of threatened species and their projected distributions, experts estimated the cost, feasibility and potential benefits of each strategy for improving the persistence of threatened species with and without climate change. We discover that the relative cost-effectiveness of invasive animal control strategies is robust to climate change, with the management of feral pigs being the highest priority for conserving threatened species overall. Complementary sets of strategies to protect as many threatened species as possible under limited budgets change when climate change is considered, with additional strategies required to avoid impending extinctions from the region. Overall we find that the ranking of strategies by cost-effectiveness was relatively unaffected by including climate change into decision-making, even though the benefits of the strategies were lower. Future climate conditions and impacts on range shifts become most important to consider when designing comprehensive management plans for the control of invasive animals under limited budgets to maximize the number of threatened species that can be protected. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 27 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 95 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Australia 3 3%
South Africa 1 1%
United Kingdom 1 1%
Germany 1 1%
Mexico 1 1%
Brazil 1 1%
Finland 1 1%
China 1 1%
Unknown 85 89%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 29 31%
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 17%
Student > Bachelor 10 11%
Student > Master 9 9%
Other 8 8%
Other 23 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 41 43%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 32 34%
Unspecified 11 12%
Social Sciences 3 3%
Engineering 2 2%
Other 6 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 31. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 September 2016.
All research outputs
#447,138
of 12,353,915 outputs
Outputs from Global Change Biology
#523
of 3,359 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#11,858
of 239,832 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Global Change Biology
#22
of 132 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,353,915 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,359 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 19.2. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 239,832 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 132 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.