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Presence and location of modified nucleotides in Escherichia coli tmRNA: structural mimicry with tRNA acceptor branches

Overview of attention for article published in EMBO Journal, June 1998
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (71st percentile)

Mentioned by

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48 patents
wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages

Citations

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111 Dimensions

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45 Mendeley
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Title
Presence and location of modified nucleotides in Escherichia coli tmRNA: structural mimicry with tRNA acceptor branches
Published in
EMBO Journal, June 1998
DOI 10.1093/emboj/17.11.3188
Pubmed ID
Authors

B. Felden

Abstract

Escherichia coli tmRNA functions uniquely as both tRNA and mRNA and possesses structural elements similar to canonical tRNAs. To test whether this mimicry extends to post-transcriptional modification, the technique of combined liquid chromatography/ electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LC/ESIMS) and sequence data were used to determine the molecular masses of all oligonucleotides produced by RNase T1 hydrolysis with a mean error of 0.1 Da. Thus, this allowed for the detection, chemical characterization and sequence placement of modified nucleotides which produced a change in mass. Also, chemical modifications were used to locate mass-silent modifications. The native E.coli tmRNA contains two modified nucleosides, 5-methyluridine and pseudouridine. Both modifications are located within the proposed tRNA-like domain, in a seven-nucleotide loop mimicking the conserved sequence of T loops in canonical tRNAs. Although tmRNA acceptor branches (acceptor stem and T stem-loop) utilize different architectural rules than those of canonical tRNAs, their conformations in solution may be very similar. A comparative structural and functional analysis of unmodified tmRNA made by in vitro transcription and native E.coli tmRNA suggests that one or both of these post-transcriptional modifications may be required for optimal stability of the acceptor branch which is needed for efficient aminoacylation.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 45 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Italy 1 2%
Unknown 44 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 14 31%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 24%
Professor 5 11%
Professor > Associate Professor 4 9%
Student > Bachelor 2 4%
Other 7 16%
Unknown 2 4%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 24 53%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 11 24%
Chemistry 5 11%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 2%
Environmental Science 1 2%
Other 2 4%
Unknown 1 2%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 October 2020.
All research outputs
#4,232,224
of 20,888,897 outputs
Outputs from EMBO Journal
#3,128
of 12,182 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#82,884
of 298,550 outputs
Outputs of similar age from EMBO Journal
#42
of 58 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,888,897 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 76th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 12,182 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 298,550 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 58 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.