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Differences in Longer-Term Smoking Abstinence After Treatment by Specialist or Nonspecialist Advisors: Secondary Analysis of Data From a Relapse Prevention Trial

Overview of attention for article published in Nicotine & Tobacco Research, July 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (72nd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (64th percentile)

Mentioned by

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7 tweeters

Citations

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8 Dimensions

Readers on

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19 Mendeley
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Title
Differences in Longer-Term Smoking Abstinence After Treatment by Specialist or Nonspecialist Advisors: Secondary Analysis of Data From a Relapse Prevention Trial
Published in
Nicotine & Tobacco Research, July 2015
DOI 10.1093/ntr/ntv148
Pubmed ID
Authors

Fujian Song, Vivienne Maskrey, Annie Blyth, Tracey J. Brown, Garry R. Barton, Paul Aveyard, Caitlin Notley, Richard Holland, Max O. Bachmann, Stephen Sutton, Thomas H. Brandon

Abstract

Smokers receiving support in specialist centres tend to have a higher short-term quit rate, compared with those receiving support in other settings from professionals for whom smoking cessation is only a part of their work. We investigated the difference in longer-term abstinence after short-term smoking cessation treatment from specialist and non-specialist smoking cessation services. We conducted a secondary analysis of data from a randomised controlled trial of self-help booklets for the prevention of smoking relapse. The trial included 1,088 short-term quitters from specialist stop smoking clinics and 316 from non-specialist cessation services (such as general practice, pharmacies, and health trainer services). The difference in prolonged smoking abstinence from months four to 12 between specialist and non-specialist services was compared. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were conducted to investigate the association between continuous smoking abstinence and the type of smoking cessation services, adjusted for possible confounding factors (including demographic, socioeconomic, and smoking history variables). The proportion of continuous abstinence from four to 12 months was higher in short-term quitters from specialist services compared with those from non-specialist services (39% vs. 32%; P=0.023). After adjusting for a range of participant characteristics and smoking variables, the specialist service was significantly associated with a higher rate of longer-term smoking abstinence (odds ratio 1.48, 95% CI: 1.09 to 2.00; P=0.011). People who receive support to stop smoking from a specialist appear to be at lower risk of relapse than those receiving support from a non-specialist advisor.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 19 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Australia 1 5%
Unknown 18 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 4 21%
Student > Master 4 21%
Researcher 3 16%
Student > Bachelor 3 16%
Other 2 11%
Other 3 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 6 32%
Unspecified 4 21%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 16%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 16%
Social Sciences 1 5%
Other 2 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 April 2016.
All research outputs
#3,129,240
of 12,029,028 outputs
Outputs from Nicotine & Tobacco Research
#863
of 1,831 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#64,084
of 235,187 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nicotine & Tobacco Research
#16
of 45 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,029,028 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 73rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,831 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 235,187 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 45 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.